Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been working on a small project in Lisp recently to practice. It's a simple database creator/manager, and so far, it works pretty well! I only have one problem: When I dump the property list that is the database in [what should be] a human readable format, I can only print the values. I also need to print the property name and, with my current function, I can't.

Here's my code so far (Writing from memory, it isn't copy/pasted):

(defun dump-list (list-to-dump &optional prefix)
  (if (not (boundp prefix)) (setq prefix "") ;If it's nil, bind it to ""
  (if (not (stringp prefix)) ;If they specified anything other than a string
    (format "~a~%" "argument:prefix must be a string!")) ;then yell at them.
  (dolist (item list-to-dump) ;Iterate through the items in the list
    (if (listp item) ;If the item itself is a list (nested lists)
      (dump-list item (concatenate 'string prefix "  "));then dump that too, indented
    (format t "~a~%" item)));Here's where I need help. I can't figure out how to
                        ;output the value and its label at the same time.

It works pretty well, but only prints the value stored, not the name of the property. I am looking for something formatted like this:

LABEL1: VALUE1
LABEL2: VALUE2
LABEL3:
  NESTEDLABEL1: NESTEDVAL1
  NESTEDLABEL2: NESTEDVAL2
  NESTEDLABEL3: 
    TOOMANYLAYERS:YEP.
    SORRY: ABOUT THAT.

for a list created like this:

(list :LABEL1 "VALUE1" :LABEL2 "VALUE2" :LABEL3
  (list :NESTEDLABEL1 "NESTEDVALUE1" :NESTEDLABEL2 "NESTEDVALUE2" :NESTEDVALUE3
    (list :TOOMANYLAYERS "YEP." :SORRY "ABOUT THAT.")))

Sorry for any incorrect syntax there, I'm by no means an expert in Lisp.

prefix is so that, if you want indenting, it can happen. It's mostly used to print the child lists two more spaces than their parent list.

I'll do my best to stay up to date, but I am in school so probably can't check this until around six hours from now, which is when I get home.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. You forgot to pass the first argument (result-type) to concatenate.

  2. You forgot to pass the first argument (destination) to format.

  3. Your default argument handling can be simplified.

  4. Please avoid dangling parens, they violate the accepted style.

  5. To answer your actual question: use loop

Here is my code:

(defun dump-list (list-to-dump &optional (prefix ""))
  (unless (stringp prefix) ; or (check-type prefix string) instead of the whole unless form
    (setq prefix (princ-to-string prefix))) ; or (coerce prefix 'string) instead of princ
  (fresh-line) ; start with a new line if something has already been printed
  (loop :for (label item) :on list-to-dump :by #'cddr :do
    (format t "~a~a:" prefix label)
    (if (consp item) ; treat NIL as a single value, not a list
        (dump-list item (concatenate 'string prefix "  "))
        (format t " ~a~%" item))))

It prints what you want:

LABEL1: VALUE1
LABEL2: VALUE2
LABEL3:
  NESTEDLABEL1: NESTEDVALUE1
  NESTEDLABEL2: NESTEDVALUE2
  NESTEDVALUE3:
    TOOMANYLAYERS: YEP.
    SORRY: ABOUT THAT.

If you insist on checking the type of prefix (instead of converting it to a string), please use check-type as indicated in the code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tips! This answered my question. As I've said, I am just learning Lisp, so any help... helps? I have been doing the danling parens because it is easier to keep track. Is there any reason, besides convention, to block them all up? –  newbiedoodle Jan 23 at 0:24
    
By the way, I'l edit my original code to be correct. –  newbiedoodle Jan 23 at 0:29
1  
You track parens by the matching tools your editor provides. You can also search for lisp style - there are many and some offer a rationale. –  sds Jan 23 at 3:39
    
Sorry, when I wrote "it's easier to keep track" I didn't mean for programming. I'm used to Java, so I like being able to see the end of the block easily. I dislike being forced to rely on my IDE. –  newbiedoodle Jan 23 at 14:24
1  
The program structure ("where the block ends") is read from indentation. –  sds Jan 23 at 14:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.