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I'm having a problem (at least I think I have a problem) with the following calculation:

ppm <- 20
mDa <- 2
x <- c( 100, 100.002 )

base  <- 1 + ((x * ppm * 1E-6) + (mDa * 1E-3))/x
base
# [1] 1.00004 1.00004
base - 1.00004
# [1]  0.00000e+00 -3.99992e-10

logb( x[2], base[2] ) - logb( x[1], base[1] )
# [1] 1.651291

However, I would have expected that the result is approximately 0.5, since I expected the base to be in both cases to be approximately 1.00004:

logb( x[2], 1.00004 ) - logb( x[1], 1.00004 )
# [1] 0.500005

Although I have no proof at hand, I doubt that the result of logb( x[2], 1.00004 ) - logb( x[1], 1.00004 ) is mathematically correct and I assume that I hit a numerical precision issue. Any ideas how to avoid this problem are highly appreciated.

Edit

What I'm actually trying to do

I need to rescale positive numbers (a, b) -> (a',b') with b > a, such that the difference of two numbers on the new scale d'( a', b' ) = b' - a' is larger 1 iff the difference on the original scale d(a, b) = b -[ a + ( a * ppm * 1E-6) + (mDa * 1E-3)] is larger zero. I know that there might be a problem, because d(a, b) ≠ d(b, a). Typical ranges for the values are a,b ∈ [50, 1500], mDa ∈ [0, 10] and ppm ∈ [1, 50].

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Since x is 2-dimensional, so is (x * ppm * 1E-6) + (mDa * 1E-3). What do you mean the difference between a and b is larger than this value? –  josilber Jan 22 '14 at 17:02
    
@josilber good question :-/ I edited the last paragraph to (hopfully) clarify things. –  Beasterfield Jan 22 '14 at 17:25
    
Well, looks like you could do all the rescaling directly without resorting to logarithms or extended precision (mpfr or gmp). How many digits of precision in b-a-tiny_number >0 do you really need? –  Carl Witthoft Jan 22 '14 at 17:49
    
@CarlWitthoft the smallest value tiny_number can have with my parameters (mDa = 0, ppm = 1, a = 50) would be 5E-5. –  Beasterfield Jan 22 '14 at 17:56
    
So you are looking for a single function to convert a -> a' and b -> b'? –  James Jan 22 '14 at 18:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

When you're taking logarithms of large numbers with a base very close to 1, small differences in that base can lead to noticeable differences in the final value. Your bases differ by 0.0000000004, but that can make a difference with a base very close to 1:

logb(100, 1.0000399996)
# 115132.7
logb(100, 1.00004)
# 115131.6
logb(100, 1.0000400004)
# 115130.4
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Take a look at curve(logb(100,x),0,2) to see what the issue is: a singularity at base=1 leads to hyperbolic growth. –  James Jan 22 '14 at 16:28
    
That's true but doesn't really answer the OP's question -- which I interpreted as "how do I maintain sufficient precision when calculating oddball logarithms on a computer?" –  Carl Witthoft Jan 22 '14 at 16:38
    
@CarlWitthoft I'm saying here that he isn't experiencing numerical precision issues -- the reason he got 1.65 instead of 0.5 is because of the (small) difference in the base. –  josilber Jan 22 '14 at 16:41
    
Oops, sorry -- I thought he was wondering why different ways of calculating the base led to different answers :-( –  Carl Witthoft Jan 22 '14 at 16:46
    
@CarlWitthoft and josilber many thanks for pointing this out, in this case I must have conceptual mistake in my formula. Any ideas how I reac my actual goal? Please see my Edit for this. –  Beasterfield Jan 22 '14 at 16:55

Try Rmpfr :

Rgames> rfoo<-mpfr(100,100)
Rgames> log100<-log(rfoo)
Rgames> log100
1 'mpfr' number of precision  100   bits 
[1] 4.6051701859880913680359829093676
Rgames> logbase<-log(mpfr(1.0004,100))
Rgames> log100/logbase
1 'mpfr' number of precision  100   bits 
[1] 11515.227896589510924644721707849
Rgames> logbase<-log(mpfr(1.00004,100))
Rgames> log100/logbase
1 'mpfr' number of precision  100   bits 
[1] 115131.55721932987847380223102368

Thus showing that josilber's answer is spot-on.

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Did not know about this package, I was actually looking for something like this. Great. –  Carlos Cinelli Jan 22 '14 at 18:09

@josiber is right, log(1.00004) is approximately 0.00004 so you divide by a tiny number and get huge results... So the difference you observe is relatively small.

If you seek better accuracy without extended precision library, you could also try using log1p(x) which compute log(1+x)

baseM1  <- ((x * ppm * 1E-6) + (mDa * 1E-3))/x

then

log( x[2] )/log1p( baseM1[2] ) - log( x[1] )/log1p( baseM1[1] )
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Did you try it? It doesn't make any difference –  James Jan 23 '14 at 9:46
    
@James you are right, no difference because the diff between bases is about 10^-10. log1p would be interesting with diff approaches 10^-15 –  aka.nice Jan 23 '14 at 16:55

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