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I have a program that creates a file and writes to it using ofstream. I need the program to be able to parse command line parameters later on. But for some reason, it does not create a file when I drag-and-drop a file onto the compiled executable, even if the program doesn't involve any command line parameters at all. If the executable is run normally, it works. So I'm left totally confused. Here is the source:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    ofstream outfile;
    outfile.open("test.txt");

    if(outfile.is_open())
    {
        outfile << "Test";
        outfile.close();
    }
    else cout << "Unable to open file";

    return 0;
}

Does anybody have any ideas? I appreciate any help.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have permission in the folder containing the file you're dragging? Windows sets the working directory of the program according to the dragged file. –  LeakyCode Jan 24 '10 at 21:57
1  
Well, you hard-coded the filename. Rewrite your main declaration to take argc and argv arguments and use them in your code. –  Hans Passant Jan 24 '10 at 22:03
    
It doesn't work for me either, with Win2K, and I definitely have all permissions on everything. –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 22:05
    
@nobugz I can't see how Windows can know what goes on inside the code. –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 22:06
    
@Mehrdad I believe so, the file I'm dragging is in the same directory as the executable. @nobugz I want it to be hard-coded, because it is the file I'm creating. If I don't include argc and argv shouldn't command line arguments be ignored? That's what I want at the moment, but it doesn't seem to be true. –  kaykun Jan 24 '10 at 22:07
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4 Answers

You are not using the command line arguments at all. Recode your main() method to look like this:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  if (argc != 2) 
  {
    cout << "Usage: blah.exe file" << endl;
    return 1;
  }
  ofstream outfile;
  outfile.open(argv[1]);
  if(outfile.is_open())
  {
    outfile << "Test";
    outfile.close();
  }
  else cout << "Unable to open file";
  return 0;
}

Be careful what you drop, your code rewrites the file contents.

share|improve this answer
    
I should have clarified, I don't want to write to the file that I dragged in. I want to create a new file that has no relation to the dragged-in file and write to it, just for testing purposes. –  kaykun Jan 24 '10 at 22:10
    
Then you can't use drag+drop of course. It is very unclear to me how you'd want to take advantage of D+D. Maybe you can use the directory of the file that got dropped? –  Hans Passant Jan 24 '10 at 22:16
    
In the end I want the program to be able to have a file dragged onto it and have the program analyze it and generate another text file based on the dragged file, but a different filename. But for now, I'm trying to solve this simple problem because it won't let me create any file whenever any file gets dragged onto it. –  kaykun Jan 24 '10 at 22:22
1  
Well, you got the part where you get the file that needs to be analyzed. You can do whatever you want with the file that is created from the analysis results. Using a full path name is highly recommended. Take a look at the _splitpath() CRT function. –  Hans Passant Jan 24 '10 at 22:29
add comment

The following code does what the OP wants:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main ( int argc, char ** argv )
{
    cout << argv[1] << endl;
    ofstream outfile;
    outfile.open("testzzzzzzz.txt");

    if(outfile.is_open())
    {
        outfile << "Testzzzzz";
        outfile.close();
        cout << "wrote file"<< endl;
    }
    else cout << "Unable to open file";

    string s;
    getline( cin, s );
    return 0;
}

It allows drag and drop, but doesn't use the dropped file name in the file open. When you drop a file in it, you get the message

"wrote file"

Unfortunately, at the moment I have no idea where it wrote the file - not in the current directory, definitely. Just going to do a search...

Edit: It creates it in your Documents and Settings directory. So to put it in the current directory, you probably need to explicitly prefix it with "./", but I havent't tested this - I leave it as an exercise for the reader :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but outfile.open("./test.txt"); still creates the file in the Documents and Settings directory. Any suggestions? –  kaykun Jan 24 '10 at 22:42
    
Extract the path from the dropped file and use that for the path for the new one, is all I can think of. This seems pretty bizarre behaviour, but I suppose one should never be suprised by Windows. –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 22:47
    
@Kaykun: where do you want it to put the file? –  John Knoeller Jan 25 '10 at 1:14
    
I want to create the new file in the same directory as the executable, and as a different filename than the dropped file. –  kaykun Jan 25 '10 at 2:10
1  
You can get the full path of the .exe by calling the Win32 API GetModuleFilename(), pass NULL as the first parameter. Strip off everYthing after the last \ and you have the exe path. –  John Knoeller Jan 25 '10 at 8:36
show 1 more comment

Since you have not specified a path, the file, test.txt, will be saved to the default path. Just bring up a command prompt (i.e. run cmd.exe) and the command prompt will show you the default path. The file should be in this directory.

You can change the default path by editing the HOMEDRIVE & HOMEPATH environment variables.

Also, you should note the other answers. You should be using argc/argv to specify the output file.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. If I wanted to create a file under the same directory as the executable (which would vary on different computers) and also under a different filename as the dragged file how would I handle that? –  kaykun Jan 24 '10 at 22:38
add comment

you haven't specified a path for "test.txt" so it will try and create that file in the current working directory of the executable. This will be different when the exe is invoked by dropping a file on it than it is when you run the program normally.

Try giving "test.txt" a full path and see if that works.

edit: To write your output file to the path that contains the exe, you would use

GetModuleFileName(NULL, ...) to the the full path of the exe, then PathRemoveFileSpec to strip off the exe name, leaving just the exe path then PathCombine to append test.txt to the exe path

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried it with all files in the same directory - it still doesn't work. –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 22:19
    
Sound like main isn't even getting invoked. Id add a call to DebugBreak(), at the top of main to see if you are even getting there. –  John Knoeller Jan 24 '10 at 22:22
    
Thanks, but changing it to "C:\text.txt" gives me the program error "Unable to open file". –  kaykun Jan 24 '10 at 22:24
    
don't forget that you have to double your \\ inside a string literal "c:\\text.txt" –  John Knoeller Jan 24 '10 at 22:34
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