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the following code:

myQueue.enqueue('a');
myQueue.enqueue('b');
cout << myQueue.dequeue() << myQueue.dequeue();

prints "ba" to the console

while:

myQueue.enqueue('a');
myQueue.enqueue('b');
cout << myQueue.dequeue();
cout << myQueue.dequeue();

prints "ab" why is this?

It seems as though cout is calling the outermost (closest to the ;) function first and working its way in, is that the way it behaves?

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where did all of the answers go? now there is only one? –  finiteloop Jan 24 '10 at 22:53
1  
The answerers deleted them because they realised they were wrong. –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 22:54
1  
Some people delete answers when they find out they are wrong. –  Anon. Jan 24 '10 at 22:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

There's no sequence point with the << operator so the compiler is free to evaluate either dequeue function first. What is guaranteed is that the result of the second dequeue call (in the order in which it appears in the expression and not necessarily the order in which it is evaluated) is <<'ed to the result of <<'ing the first (if you get what I'm saying).

So the compiler is free to translate your code into some thing like any of these (pseudo intermediate c++). This isn't intended to be an exhaustive list.

auto tmp2 = myQueue.dequeue();
auto tmp1 = myQueue.dequeue();
std::ostream& tmp3 = cout << tmp1;
tmp3 << tmp2;

or

auto tmp1 = myQueue.dequeue();
auto tmp2 = myQueue.dequeue();
std::ostream& tmp3 = cout << tmp1;
tmp3 << tmp2;

or

auto tmp1 = myQueue.dequeue();
std::ostream& tmp3 = cout << tmp1;
auto tmp2 = myQueue.dequeue();
tmp3 << tmp2;

Here's what the temporaries correspond to in the original expression.

cout << myQueue.dequeue() << myQueue.dequeue();
|       |               |    |               |
|       |____ tmp1 _____|    |_____ tmp2 ____|
|                       |
|________ tmp3 _________|
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so, in the top example, would std::ostream& tmp3 = cout << tmp1; tmp3 << tmp2; be like saying "cout << tmp1 << tmp2;"? Or something I'm missing? –  finiteloop Jan 24 '10 at 22:57
    
@segfault: Yes, because that is the way << associates in C++ grammar. a << b << c always groups as (a << b) << c. –  Charles Bailey Jan 24 '10 at 23:03
    
but by that logic, wouldnt saying cout << a << b be saying (cout << a) << b and do anything necessary to cout a first (i.e. call myQueue.dequeue())? –  finiteloop Jan 24 '10 at 23:07
6  
The associativity doesn't say anything about the order in which the subexpressions are evaluated. cout << a << b always means (cout << a) << b but the compiler is free to evaluate b first, then a, then the first << operation and the the second. This is exactly the point that I made in my answer. –  Charles Bailey Jan 24 '10 at 23:11
    
ah. now it makes sense. thanks. –  finiteloop Jan 24 '10 at 23:43

The call from your example:

cout << myQueue.dequeue() << myQueue.dequeue();

translates to the following expression with two calls of operator<< function:

operator<<( operator<<( cout, myQueue.dequeue() ), myQueue.dequeue() );
-------------------- 1
---------2

The order of evaluation of cout, myQueue.dequeue() is unspecified. However, the order of operator<< function calls is well specified, as marked with 1 and 2

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