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In my multithreaded server I have somefunction(), which needs to protect two independent of each other global data using EnterCriticalSection.

somefunction()
{
  EnterCriticalSection(&g_List); 
  ...
  EnterCriticalSection(&g_Variable); 
   ...
  LeaveCriticalSection(&g_Variable);
   ...  
  LeaveCriticalSection(&g_List);
}

Following the advice of better programmers i'm going to use a RAII wrapper. For example:

class Locker
{
  public:
  Locker(CSType& cs): m_cs(cs)
  {
    EnterCriticalSection(&m_cs);
  }
  ~Locker()
  {
    LeaveCriticalSection(&m_cs);
  }
  private:
  CSType&  m_cs;
}

My question: Is it ok to transform somefunction() to this? (putting 2 Locker in one function):

somefunction()
{
 // g_List,g_Variable previously initialized via InitializeCriticalSection

    Locker  lock(g_List);
    Locker  lock(g_Variable);
    ...
    ...
}

?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your current solution has potential dead lock case. If you have two (or more) CSTypes which will be locked in different order this way, you will end up in dead lock. Best way would be to lock them both atomically. You can see an example of this in boost thread library. shared_lock and unique_lock can be used in deferred mode so that first you prepare all raii objects for all mutex objects, and then lock them all atomically in one call to lock function.

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what if i always keep the same order of locking, does it matter? –  maciekm Jan 22 '14 at 20:52
    
Yes, but practice shows that it's really hard to do across any nontrivial application. –  Tomasz Kłak Jan 22 '14 at 21:28

As long as you keep lock order the same in your threads its OK. Do you really need to lock them both at the same time? Also with scoped lock you can add scopes to control when to unlock, something like this:

{
    // use inner scopes to control lock duration
    {
        Locker lockList (g_list);
        // do something
    } // unlocked at the end

    Locker lockVariable (g_variable);
        // do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
if i put these additional brackets, all trouble mentioned by Tomasz Kłak dissappear? –  maciekm Jan 22 '14 at 20:59
1  
No, you need to keep the same order of locks in all threads, code I gave is just to show what scoped lock allows you to do. –  mindo Jan 22 '14 at 21:02

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