Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

abc.c file

#include "abc.h"
int abc()
{
    return 10;
}

abc.h file

int abc();

mymain.cpp file

#include "abc.h"
int main()
{
    abc();
    return  0;
}

Makefile

CC=gcc -O2 
CP=g++

mymain: mymain.o abc.o
    $(CP) -o mymain mymain.o abc.o

mymain.o: mymain.cpp abc.h
    $(CP) -c mymain.cpp abc.h

abc.o: abc.c abc.h
    $(CC) -c abc.c abc.h

clean:  
    $(RM) *.o mymain

output

g++ -c mymain.cpp abc.h
gcc -O2  -c abc.c abc.h
g++ -o mymain mymain.o abc.o
mymain.o: In function `main':
mymain.cpp:(.text+0x5): undefined reference to `abc()'
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status
make: *** [mymain] Error 1

Why abc() is undefined reference ??

UPDATE

new abc.h

extern "C" {
    int abc();
}

error

g++ -c mymain.cpp abc.h
gcc -O2  -c abc.c abc.h
In file included from abc.c:1:0:
abc.h:1:8: error: expected identifier or ‘(’ before string constant
 extern "C" {
        ^
abc.h:1:8: error: expected identifier or ‘(’ before string constant
 extern "C" {
        ^
make: *** [abc.o] Error 1
share|improve this question
1  
Don't pass abc.h to the compiler. Header files are processed when they're #includeed by .c or .cpp files. –  Keith Thompson Jan 22 at 21:07
1  
Also, CP is a really bad name for this. Most people will think you're trying to copy a file. The default variable name in make for C++ compiler is CXX (and CXXFLAGS for C++ compiler-specific flags). –  MadScientist Jan 22 at 21:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The problem is you're trying to link a C function into a C++ object, without telling the compiler this is what you're doing.

If your header file (abc.h) looked like this:

extern "C" {
    int abc();
}

it would work (when included into a C++ source... but would break when included into a C source).

You can enclose the extern "C" { and its trailing } within macros as shown in Combining C++ and C - how does #ifdef __cplusplus work? in order to be suitable for both C and C++ inclusion.

Note that $(CP) -c mymain.cpp abc.h in your makefile does not make sense -- you don't want to specify the header on your compiler command line. This goes for both instances of that pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
+1! Now I finally know what extern "C" means, and I didn't even have to google it! –  BWG Jan 22 at 21:04
    
@mah Thank you for quick answer. I am getting another error. I have updated the question. –  shantanu Jan 22 at 21:09
    
@shantanu You need to conditionally exclude it when compiling the .c file because the C compiler doesn't know about extern "C" –  JustSid Jan 22 at 21:10
    
I got it. It's makefile. I need to remove abc.h from $(CP) -c mymain.cpp –  shantanu Jan 22 at 21:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.