Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

On Win 8.1 64bit, using WinPython 3.3.2 64bit [only on THIS version!] solving the Euler Problem #10, the two functions prob10 and prob10i yield different results:

def no_primes():
    return {j for i in range(2,5000) for j in range(i*2, 10000000,i)}

def primes():
    return \[i for i in range(2,10000000) if i not in no_primes()\]  


def prob10():    
        return int(sum(list(map(float,\[i for i in primes() if i<2000000\]))))

def prob10i():    
        return sum(\[i for i in primes() if i<2000000\])][1]

In other words, if you convert them to float before summing, the result is correct. If you just sum them, the result is less than 1% of the correct result (overflow?).

All numbers involved are way, way below sys.maxsize, so WHAT IS THE PROBLEM? Is there effectively some kind of sys.maxint [which does not exist in Python3]?

share|improve this question
1  
Can you post the code for your primes function? Maybe it is giving some weird results ... –  Bas Swinckels Jan 22 '14 at 21:07
    
@BasSwinckels: Good point. Maybe primes is a generator that uses some global instead of local state, or something? –  abarnert Jan 22 '14 at 21:14
1  
As a side note: Why all the extra complexity of list(map(float, [i for…]))) instead of just [float(i) for i…]? (For that matter, why build a list, much less two of them, instead of just summing the iterator from map, or from a genexpr?) –  abarnert Jan 22 '14 at 21:17
    
Are you absolutely sure that it's the float version that's correct and the int version that's incorrect? The opposite should be the case. How do you know the correct value? –  delnan Jan 22 '14 at 23:18
    
Thanks for comments. This is the generator: def no_primes(): return {j for i in range(2,5000) for j in range(i*2, 10000000,i)} def primes(): return [i for i in range(2,10000000) if i not in no_primes()] –  user3225173 Jan 23 '14 at 5:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.