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So I am trying to calculate the Pareto front (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareto_efficiency) in R and am able to do it, however, I am not able to do it efficiently. In particular as the number of pairs of points increases, the computations slow down considerably.

So in general, what I want to do is check for all non-dominated (or dominated) pairs. Now the way I have been doing this is to find all such pair of points such that xi > X and yi > Y where (xi, yi) are a single pair and X and Y represent all points x and y. Now, this part works very fast and is easy to implement, however, there is the additional possibility that multiple x values may be the same but they will have different y values so in that case I want to be able to identify the x value that has the lowest y value (and vise versa for points that have identical y values but different x values).

To illustrate this point here is a picture from Wikipedia:

enter image description here

so basically I want to be able to identify all points that lie on the red line.

Here is my code that does work but is very inefficient for large datasets:

#Example Data that actually runs quickly
x = runif(10000)
y = runif(10000)

pareto = 1:length(x)

for(i in 1:length(x)){
    cond1 = y[i]!=min(y[which(x==x[i])])
    cond2 = x[i]!=min(x[which(y==y[i])])
    for(n in 1:length(x)){
        if((x[i]>x[n]  &  y[i]>y[n]) | (x[i]==x[n] & cond1) | (y[i]==y[n] & cond2)){
            pareto[i] = NA
            break
        }
    }
}
#All points not on the red line should be marks as NA in the pareto variable

The slow down definitely comes from calculating the points where (x[i]==x[n] & cond1) | (y[i]==y[n] & cond2) but I cannot find a way around it or a better Boolean expression to capture everything that I want. any suggestions greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
In the rPref package I did a efficient implementation of Pareto frontiers (Skylines) in C++. – Patrick Roocks Aug 13 '14 at 13:56

Following @BrodieG

system.time( {
    d = data.frame(x,y)
    D = d[order(d$x,d$y,decreasing=FALSE),]
    front = D[which(!duplicated(cummin(D$y))),]
} )

   user  system elapsed 
   0.02    0.00    0.02 

which is 0.86/0.02 = 43 times faster!

share|improve this answer

EDIT: new version:

system.time( {
  pareto.2 <- logical(length(x))
  x.sort <- sort(x)
  y.sort <- y[order(x)]
  y.min <- max(y)
  for(i in 1:length(x.sort)) {
    if(pareto.2[i] <- y.sort[i] <= y.min) y.min <- y.sort[i]
  }    
} )
# user  system elapsed 
# 0.036   0.000   0.035 

OLD VERSION:

This is about 6x faster on my system. You can probably do better with a better algorithm, as well as with Rcpp, but this was straightforward. The trick here is to sort by x, which then allows you to limit your check to making sure that all prior values of x must have greater values of y to ensure that point is on the frontier.

system.time( {
  pareto.2 <- logical(length(x))
  x.sort <- sort(x)
  y.sort <- y[order(x)]
  for(i in 1:length(x.sort)) {
    pareto.2[i] <- all(y.sort[1:i] >= y.sort[i])
  }    
} )
# user  system elapsed 
# 0.86    0.00    0.88          

The original:

pareto = 1:length(x)
system.time(
  for(i in 1:length(x)){
    cond1 = y[i]!= min(y[which(x==x[i])])
    cond2 = x[i]!= min(x[which(y==y[i])])
    for(n in 1:length(x)){
      if((x[i]>x[n]  &  y[i]>y[n]) | (x[i]==x[n] & cond1) | (y[i]==y[n] & cond2)){
        pareto[i] = NA
        break
      }
    }
  }  
)
# user  system elapsed 
# 5.32    0.00    5.33          

And showing the two methods produce the same result (a bit tricky because I need to re-order pareto.2 to the original order of x):

all.equal(pareto.2[match(1:length(x), order(x))], !is.na(pareto))
# [1] TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
I actually found an even faster way to solve this from someone else's post although I like the readiability of for loops. To see the answer check out stackoverflow.com/questions/21296795/counting-points-in-r where I am actually now asking another question. – user6291 Jan 23 '14 at 0:19
    
@StatMan, see new version in the answer. Seems comparable to the other one you found. – BrodieG Jan 23 '14 at 1:29

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