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I have an array of string values which sometimes form repeating value patterns ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd')

$array = array(
    'a', 'b', 'c', 'd',
    'a', 'b', 'c', 'd',
    'c', 'd',
);

I would like to find duplicate patterns based on the array order and group them by that same order (to maintain it).

$patterns = array(
    array('number' => 2, 'values' => array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd')),
    array('number' => 1, 'values' => array('c'))
    array('number' => 1, 'values' => array('d'))
);

Notice that [a,b], [b,c], & [c,d] are not patterns by themselves because they are inside the larger [a,b,c,d] pattern and the last [c,d] set only appears once so it's not a pattern either - just the individual values 'c' and 'd'

Another example:

$array = array(
    'x', 'x', 'y', 'x', 'b', 'x', 'b', 'a'
  //[.......] [.] [[......]  [......]] [.]
);

which produces

$patterns = array(
    array('number' => 2, 'values' => array('x')),
    array('number' => 1, 'values' => array('y')),
    array('number' => 2, 'values' => array('x', 'b')),
    array('number' => 1, 'values' => array('a'))
);

How can I do this?

share|improve this question
    
Well I'm trying to build a script for that but I don't understand why c and d are not in the same array. –  zeflex Jan 22 at 23:07
    
@zeflex, good question. In truth I probably wouldn't care if they were grouped together. However, c and d are not a pattern in the sequence of things because I'm assuming the array always defaults to the longest pattern when two or more items repeat and a single item array when none of them repeat. In the case of [c,d] that pattern only shows up once by itself - so it's not a pattern just a two single array items. If it helps, think of this like preg_match_all() where it never includes previous match values in the consideration of what constitutes a "match". –  Xeoncross Jan 22 at 23:10

2 Answers 2

If c and d can be grouped, this is my code:

<?php
$array = array(
    'a', 'b', 'c', 'd',
    'a', 'b', 'c', 'd',
    'c', 'd',
);

$res = array();

foreach ($array AS $value) {
    if (!isset($res[$value])) {
        $res[$value] = 0;
    }
    $res[$value]++;
}

foreach ($res AS $key => $value) {
    $fArray[$value][] = $key;
    for ($i = $value - 1; $i > 0; $i--) {
        $fArray[$i][] = $key;
    }
}

$res = array();
foreach($fArray AS $key => $value) {
    if (!isset($res[serialize($value)])) {
        $res[serialize($value)] = 0;
    }
    $res[serialize($value)]++;
}
$fArray = array();
foreach($res AS $key => $value) {
    $fArray[] = array('number' => $value, 'values' => unserialize($key));
}

echo '<pre>';
var_dump($fArray);
echo '</pre>';

Final result is:

array (size=2)
  0 => 
    array (size=2)
      'number' => int 2
      'values' => 
        array (size=4)
          0 => string 'a' (length=1)
          1 => string 'b' (length=1)
          2 => string 'c' (length=1)
          3 => string 'd' (length=1)
  1 => 
    array (size=2)
      'number' => int 1
      'values' => 
        array (size=2)
          0 => string 'c' (length=1)
          1 => string 'd' (length=1)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 That is a good start, but it doesn't preserve match order. If you add ['a', 'c', 'd'] onto the end of the array and run again it states the first match is ['a', 'c', 'd'] even though those are the last characters appended to the array. –  Xeoncross Jan 22 at 23:31
    
Well yes. But it's not really clear, also add 'd', 'e', 'f', and see what's happening. –  zeflex Jan 22 at 23:44
    
I updated the question with a better example –  Xeoncross Jan 23 at 0:07
    
In your example I don't understand why you group the letter as this. Sorry if I make you wasting time to explain but I think you goal is not really clear. –  zeflex Jan 23 at 0:23
    
sorry if it's still not clear. I'm looking for the largest repeating patterns in the sequence. In the example you posted [c,d] is not a pattern because it only appears once right before the end - so it's just individual values. (The other two times it appears are inside the larger [a,b,c,d] pattern so they don't count) –  Xeoncross Jan 23 at 16:35

I started with this now but at the end my brain burn and I don't know where to start to compare the arrays... Enjoy!

$array = array(
    'x', 'x', 'y', 'x', 'b', 'x', 'b', 'a'
    //[.......] [.] [[......]  [......]] [.]
);

$arrayCount = count($array);

$res = array();
for($i = 0; $i < $arrayCount; $i++) {
    for($j = 1; $j < $arrayCount; $j++) {
        $res[$i][] = array_slice($array, $i, $j);
    }
}

//echo '<pre>';
//var_dump($res);
//echo '</pre>';
//
//die;


$resCount = count($res);
$oneResCount = count($res[0]);
share|improve this answer

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