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I'm fiddeling with some general questions about c/c++ in perparation for an exam. One of these questions is to describe the value returned by function leer(char *a). I expected the function to return the number of whitespaces in a c string, but my tests showed that leer does in fact just check the very first char and thus just returns a 1 if the first element is a whitespace and 0 if not. It does not even iterate through the string but returns after checking the first char, while the very same loop inside the main function counts all whitespaces as I thought initially. I dont understand why they behave differently because the argument for leer is the same like the one I use in the for loop inside my main function. I assume that I lack of some pointer knowledge here but I cant figure out why my initial thoughts are wrong.

#include <iostream>

int leer(char *a)
{
    for(int b=0;*a!='\0';a++)
    {
        if(*a==' ') b++;
        return b;
    }
}

int main()
{

char *a = "Dies ist ein Test";
std::cout << leer(a) << std::endl; //Prints 0   
int b;  
for(b=0;*a!='\0';a++)
    {
        if(*a==' ') b++;
    }


std::cout << b << std::endl; //Prints 3

}
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It has nothing to do with pointers. Look at the return statement. –  Borgleader Jan 22 '14 at 22:39
    
Yeah, well, thats embarassing :D I was so focused on the pointer that I did not even notice it. Thank you for pointing it out I would have searched for hours. –  user3225499 Jan 22 '14 at 23:26

4 Answers 4

The problem is that you are returning after the first iteration. You need to place the return statement after the loop:

for(int b=0;*a!='\0';a++)
{
    if(*a==' ') b++;
}
return b;
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Thanks for the answer, I was so focused on the pointer, I didnt notice it at all. –  user3225499 Jan 22 '14 at 23:28

The two loops are not exactly the same. Notice that in leer, the return statement is inside the loop. That means it will return during the first iteration and never actually have a chance to continue through the string.

The loop in main however does not have anything preventing it from continuing through the string. The value of b is incremented and then outputted after the loop.

Your leer function should be written in the same way, where the value of b is returned after the loop.

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Kind of obvious but I was so focused on the pointer thingy :D. THanks for the answer anyway . –  user3225499 Jan 22 '14 at 23:27

The reason why it doesnt work as intended is the return statement return b;. Its theoretically executed in every iteration, but practically of course just in the first one because after we executed it we arent in a for-loop anymore.

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Thanks for the answer, I would have searched for hours :D. Totaly didnt get it. –  user3225499 Jan 22 '14 at 23:29

Because in your main() you don't have a return... like in

return b;

This will exit the loop after the first iteration.

I propose you format your code for easier reading.

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Yep, obvious once someone directs you to the correct path again. The original format in the task is even worse, it is this: int leer(char *a) { for(int b=0;*a!='\0';a++) if(*a==' ') b++; return b; } I just changed it in my compiler for whatever reason. So the correct answer to the question would be neither the amount of whitespaces nor if the first char is a whitespace. b is defined in the scope of the for loop and thus not visible for the return and the only thing this will return is a syntax error, right? –  user3225499 Jan 22 '14 at 23:38

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