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How we can undo rm -rf command ? For example, I have Application folder. And I have remove it by

rm -rf Application

But it was my mistake and want to recovery or want that Application Folder. But its not in Trash folder. What should I do now ? Is there any command to undo rm -rf .

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closed as off-topic by Oliver Charlesworth, Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Porges, Ilan Frumer, Jeyaram Jan 23 at 1:09

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I recommend it : stackoverflow.com/questions/21026636/… –  MortezaLSC Jan 23 at 5:14
    
In principle you cannot undo rm (or unlink(2) which it would call). Learn to make backups, and to use version control systems (like git ...) for your source files. –  Basile Starynkevitch Jan 23 at 5:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Short answer: you can't¹. Files that get unlinked are irreversibly gone. If you really cared about what you deleted (e.g. personal files that cannot be reproduced), you could run photorec and try to recover as many files as possible, but you will loose any directory structure and naming.

Anyway, since you deleted the Applications folder, reinstalling everything could be the simple way to go. Provided that Applications folder contained installed applications.


1: some filesystems (will) support undeletion, but it's not your case.

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