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I know in C# when you have an object you want to use as a lock for multi-threading, you should declare it as static inside of a class, which the class instance will be running in a separate thread.

Does this hold true for Java as well? Some examples online seem to declare the lock object as only final...

Edit: I have a resource that I want to limit to only one thread access at a time. A class that extends Thread will be used to create multiple instances and started at the same time. What should I use?

Thanks.

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Actually if you want to lock the whole class you can just do that: synchronized(MyClass.class){...} You don't need a static lock object. Unless you have multiple resources. ALSO you can use java.util.concurrent.locks.* which have a lot of useful lock types with more flexability. –  Chad Okere Jan 25 '10 at 6:04
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Depends on in which context they are to be used. If you want a per-instance lock, then leave static away. If you want a per-class lock, then use static. Further indeed keep it final.

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Thanks, owe you another one :-P –  individual101101 Jan 25 '10 at 2:04
2  
If you want a per-class lock, then you are probably doing something wrong (it can be useful for the likes of caches, but generally mutable statics are bad). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 25 '10 at 2:16
    
I have a resource that I want to limit to only one thread access at a time. A class that extends Thread will be used to create multiple instances and started at the same time. What should I use? –  individual101101 Jan 25 '10 at 2:19
    
Then use a per-class (static) lock, or consider using a synchronized method for the particular puspose. –  BalusC Jan 25 '10 at 2:24
    
Gotcha, thanks. –  individual101101 Jan 25 '10 at 2:26
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Simple answer, no. Long answer, it depends on what you want.

private static final Object STATIC_LOCK = new Object();

private final Object lock = new Object();

public void doSomething() {
    synchronized (STATIC_LOCK) {
        // At most, one thread can enter this portion
    }

    synchronized (lock) {
        // Many threads can be here at once, but only one per object of the class
    }
}

With that being said, I would recommend you look at the locks provided in java.util.concurrent.locks. Using java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock you can do the following:

Lock l = ...;
l.lock();
try {
    // access the resource protected by this lock
} finally {
    l.unlock();
}  
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That clarifies even more. Thanks. –  individual101101 Jan 25 '10 at 13:39
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No

In Java it is possible to use non-static members as locks.

private Object lock = new Object();

public void test(){
    synchronized (lock) {
      // your code  
    }
}
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Yes, that compiles :) –  BalusC Jan 25 '10 at 2:29
1  
As IntelliJ likes to tell me "Synchronization on a non-final field is unlikely to have useful semantics." –  Kylar Jan 25 '10 at 2:43
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