Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public class MyObject
{
    public static enum Type {A, B, C, D;}

    public static final int ID_MAIN = 1;
    public static final int ID_MAIN_UK = 2;
    public static final int ID_MAIN_US = 3;
    public static final int ID_SUB = 4;
    // lots more constants here

    public static final String DESCRIPTION_1 = "Desc Full Name";
    public static final String DESCRIPTION_2 = "Desc2 Full Name";
    // lots more constants here

    private int id;

    public MyObject(final int id)
    {
        this.id = id;
    }

    //simple getter 
    public int getID() { return this.id;}

    // real responsibility of the class is in the following two methods
    public static String getDescription()
    {
         switch(id)
         {
              case MyObject.ID_MAIN:
              case MyObject.ID_MAIN_UK:
                  return MyObject.DESCRIPTION_1;
              case MyObject.ID_SUB:
                  return MyObject_Description_2;
              default:
                   // throw IllegalArgException
          }        
     }

     public static Type getType(int id)
     {
         switch(id)
         {
             case MyObject.ID_MAIN:
             case MyObject.ID_SUB:
                 return Type.A;
             case MyObject.ID_MAIN_UK:
             case MyObject.ID_MAIN_US:
                 return Type.B;
             default:
                 return Type.Undefined;
         }
      }
 }

Basically, there is an ID that maps to both a description and a type. This ID is passed in during construction of the class and it should map to a set of constants already contained in the class. If the id is not part of the list of constants, an error is thrown when trying to get the description that maps to the id and an 'Unknown' type is return if the type is queried. The ID maps a description to a set of constants. The same ID maps to a certain Type (defined as an enum).

This code is pretty ugly because there are tons of constants defined at the top, which makes the switch statements pretty bloated. Is there a simple way to refactor this without changing the public interface? It seems trivially simple, but it seems pretty ugly no matter how you slice it. How can I simplify these mappings to make the code more concise?

I was thinking about representing the mappings in a text file and having a manager class that held simple containers in a hashmap. When the manager class is constructed, it would create the objects by reading the text file and map them to an ID. When the manager is queried with the ID, it would just call the corresponding get method, for instance:

class Manager 
{
     private HashMap<int, MyObject> objectMap;

     public Manager() {} //construct the object map
     public String getDescription(int id) { return objectMap.get(id).getDescription();}
     public Type getType(int id) { return objectMap.get(id).getType();}
}

class DataContainer
{
     private String description;
     private Type type;


     public DataContainer(String desc, Type type) {//set mem vars}
     public String getDescription() //simple getter
     public Type getType() //simple getter
 }

But this solution seems too complicated. Is there a better solution, preferably one that would keep everything in one class?

share|improve this question
1  
This answer might be better suited for codereview.stackexchange.com –  mdewitt Jan 23 '14 at 5:36
2  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about code review and should be redirected toward codereview.stackexchange.com –  Snicolas Jan 23 '14 at 5:48
    
@mdewitt: The OP obviously doesn't ask for a CR. A code-review starts with a code which the author considers close to perfect. Here the author asks how to solve a specific problem and the code is just an illustration. –  maaartinus Jan 23 '14 at 7:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do something like following. This would be much cleaner and manageable.

public enum Type
{

    MAIN(1, "Main Description"),
    MAIN_UK(2, "Main UK Description"),
    //....
    //Define all the types
    //....
    UNKNOWN(-1, "Unknown Type");

    private int id;
    private String description;

    private Type(int id, String description)
    {
        this.id = id;
        this.description = description;
    }

    public static Type getById(int id)
    {
        for (Type type : Type.values())
        {
            if (id == type.getId())
            {
                return type;
            }
        }

        return Type.UNKNOWN;
    }

    public final int getId()
    {
        return id;
    }

    public final String getDescription()
    {
        return description;
    }
}

public class MyObject
{
    private int id;
    private Type type;

    public MyObject(int id)
    {
        this.id = id;
        this.type = Type.getById(id);
    }

    public int getId()
    {
        return id;
    }

    public Type getType()
    {
        return type;
    }

    public String getDescription()
    {
        return type.getDescription();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In Java enums can have methods. For example following one accepts ID and description and provides some accessors.

public enum Type {
        MAIN(1, "desc1"),
        UK(2, "desc2"),
        SUB(4, "desc4");

        private int id;
        private String desc;

        Type(int id, String desc) {
            this.id = id;
            this.desc = desc;
        }
        public String getDescription() {
             return  desc;
        }

        public int getType() {
            //return id;
            return 1+2 + 3+ id;
        }
    }

You could use that to improve design.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.