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what is the best way to divide a list into roughly equal parts? for example, if I have a list with 54 elements and i want to split it into 3 roughly equal parts? I'd like the parts to be as even as possible, hopefully assigning the elements that do not fit in a way that gives the most equal parts. to give a concrete case, if the list has 7 elements and I want to split it into 2 parts, I'd ideally want to get the first 3 elements in one bin, the second should have 4 elements.

so to summarize I'm looking for something like even_split(l, n) that breaks l into roughly n-different parts.

the best I can think of is something that was posted here:

def chunks(l, n):
    """ Yield successive n-sized chunks from l.
    """
    for i in xrange(0, len(l), n):
        yield l[i:i+n]

example:

l = range(54)
chunks_of_three = chunks(l, 3)

but this gives chunks of 3, rather than 3 equal parts. I could simply iterate over this and take the first element of each column, call that part one, then take the second and put it in part two, etc. but that seems inefficient and inelegant. it also breaks the order of the list.

any ideas on this?

thanks.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here's one that could work:

def chunkIt(seq, num):
  avg = len(seq) / float(num)
  out = []
  last = 0.0

  while last < len(seq):
    out.append(seq[int(last):int(last + avg)])
    last += avg

  return out

Testing:

>>> chunkIt(range(10), 3)
[[0, 1, 2], [3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 8, 9]]
>>> chunkIt(range(11), 3)
[[0, 1, 2], [3, 4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9, 10]]
>>> chunkIt(range(12), 3)
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10, 11]]
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1  
Your example won't work for >>> chunkIt(range(8), 6) => [[0], [1], [2, 3], [4], [5], [6], [7]] –  nopper Oct 7 '13 at 16:01
    
@nopper, I added an "if num == 1:" conditional to handle that edge case. –  user2016290 Oct 10 '13 at 15:18

Here is my solution:

    def chunks(l, amount):
        if amount < 1:
            raise ValueError('amount must be positive integer')
        chunk_len = len(l) // amount
        leap_parts = len(l) % amount
        remainder = amount // 2  # make it symmetrical
        i = 0
        while i < len(l):
            remainder += leap_parts
            end_index = i + chunk_len
            if remainder >= amount:
                remainder -= amount
                end_index += 1
            yield l[i:end_index]
            i = end_index

Produces

    >>> list(chunks([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], 3))
    [[1, 2], [3, 4, 5], [6, 7]]
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The same as job's answer, but takes into account lists with size smaller than the number of chuncks.

def chunkify(lst,n):
    [ lst[i::n] for i in xrange(n if n < len(lst) else len(lst)) ]

if n (number of chunks) is 7 and lst (the list to divide) is [1, 2, 3] the chunks are [[0], [1], [2]] instead of [[0], [1], [2], [], [], [], []]

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Here's another variant that spreads the "remaining" elements evenly among all the chunks, one at a time until there are none left. In this implementation, the larger chunks occur at the beginning the process.

def chunks(l, k):
  """ Yield k successive chunks from l."""
  if k < 1:
    yield []
    raise StopIteration
  n = len(l)
  avg = n/k
  remainders = n % k
  start, end = 0, avg
  while start < n:
    if remainders > 0:
      end = end + 1
      remainders = remainders - 1
    yield l[start:end]
    start, end = end, end+avg

For example, generate 4 chunks from a list of 14 elements:

>>> list(chunks(range(14), 4))
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10], [11, 12, 13]]
>>> map(len, list(chunks(range(14), 4)))
[4, 4, 3, 3]
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Another way would be something like this, the idea here is to use grouper, but get rid of None. In this case we'll have all 'small_parts' formed from elements at the first part of the list, and 'larger_parts' from the later part of the list. Length of 'larger parts' is len(small_parts) + 1. We need to consider x as two different sub-parts.

from itertools import izip_longest

import numpy as np

def grouper(n, iterable, fillvalue=None): # This is grouper from itertools
    "grouper(3, 'ABCDEFG', 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx"
    args = [iter(iterable)] * n
    return izip_longest(fillvalue=fillvalue, *args)

def another_chunk(x,num):
    extra_ele = len(x)%num #gives number of parts that will have an extra element 
    small_part = int(np.floor(len(x)/num)) #gives number of elements in a small part

    new_x = list(grouper(small_part,x[:small_part*(num-extra_ele)]))
    new_x.extend(list(grouper(small_part+1,x[small_part*(num-extra_ele):])))

    return new_x

The way I have it set up returns a list of tuples:

>>> x = range(14)
>>> another_chunk(x,3)
[(0, 1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6, 7, 8), (9, 10, 11, 12, 13)]
>>> another_chunk(x,4)
[(0, 1, 2), (3, 4, 5), (6, 7, 8, 9), (10, 11, 12, 13)]
>>> another_chunk(x,5)
[(0, 1), (2, 3, 4), (5, 6, 7), (8, 9, 10), (11, 12, 13)]
>>> 
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Have a look at numpy.split:

>>> a = numpy.array([1,2,3,4])
>>> numpy.split(a, 2)
[array([1, 2]), array([3, 4])]
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2  
And numpy.array_split() is even more adequate because it roughly splits. –  Yariv Mar 9 '13 at 10:38
4  
This doesn't work if the array size isn't divisible by the number of splits. –  Dan Jul 26 '13 at 2:32

As long as you don't want anything silly like continuous chunks:

>>> def chunkify(lst,n):
...     return [ lst[i::n] for i in xrange(n) ]
... 
>>> chunkify( range(13), 3)
[[0, 3, 6, 9, 12], [1, 4, 7, 10], [2, 5, 8, 11]]
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I wouldn't say continuous chunks are silly. Perhaps you'd like to keep the chunks sorted (ie. chunk[0] < chunk[1]), for instance. –  tixxit Jan 26 '10 at 14:39
    
I was kidding. But if you really didn't care, this way with list comprehension is nice and concise. –  job Jan 26 '10 at 15:49
    
this is awesome. –  K Raphael Apr 16 at 18:56
1  
This is subscripting with a stride of n –  smci Sep 12 at 3:30

You can write it fairly simply as a list generator:

def split(a, n):
    k, m = len(a) / n, len(a) % n
    return (a[i * k + min(i, m):(i + 1) * k + min(i + 1, m)] for i in xrange(n))

Example:

>>> list(split(range(11), 3))
[[0, 1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9, 10]]
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This is just beautiful. Should have more votes... –  Vajk Hermecz Sep 24 at 0:57

Changing the code to yield n chunks rather than chunks of n:

def chunks(l, n):
    """ Yield n successive chunks from l.
    """
    newn = int(len(l) / n)
    for i in xrange(0, n-1):
        yield l[i*newn:i*newn+newn]
    yield l[n*newn-newn:]

l = range(56)
three_chunks = chunks (l, 3)
print three_chunks.next()
print three_chunks.next()
print three_chunks.next()

which gives:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17]
[18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35]
[36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55]

This will assign the extra elements to the final group which is not perfect but well within your specification of "roughly N equal parts" :-) By that, I mean 56 elements would be better as (19,19,18) whereas this gives (18,18,20).

You can get the more balanced output with the following code:

#!/usr/bin/python
def chunks(l, n):
    """ Yield n successive chunks from l.
    """
    newn = int(1.0 * len(l) / n + 0.5)
    for i in xrange(0, n-1):
        yield l[i*newn:i*newn+newn]
    yield l[n*newn-newn:]

l = range(56)
three_chunks = chunks (l, 3)
print three_chunks.next()
print three_chunks.next()
print three_chunks.next()

which outputs:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]
[19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37]
[38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55]
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this gives me a strange result. for p in chunks(range(54), 3): print len(p) returns 18, 18, 51... –  user248237dfsf Jan 25 '10 at 3:36
    
Fixed, that, it was the final yield. –  paxdiablo Jan 25 '10 at 3:37
    
see also a solition at link –  Jakob Kroeker Jul 19 '13 at 16:14
    
This is the most useful answer for practical considerations. Thanks! –  mVChr Aug 18 at 20:49

Here is one that adds None to make the lists equal length

>>> from itertools import izip_longest
>>> def chunks(l, n):
    """ Yield n successive chunks from l. Pads extra spaces with None
    """
    return list(zip(*izip_longest(*[iter(l)]*n)))

>>> l=range(54)

>>> chunks(l,3)
[(0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 39, 42, 45, 48, 51), (1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 34, 37, 40, 43, 46, 49, 52), (2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, 29, 32, 35, 38, 41, 44, 47, 50, 53)]

>>> chunks(l,4)
[(0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 44, 48, 52), (1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29, 33, 37, 41, 45, 49, 53), (2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, 34, 38, 42, 46, 50, None), (3, 7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31, 35, 39, 43, 47, 51, None)]

>>> chunks(l,5)
[(0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50), (1, 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31, 36, 41, 46, 51), (2, 7, 12, 17, 22, 27, 32, 37, 42, 47, 52), (3, 8, 13, 18, 23, 28, 33, 38, 43, 48, 53), (4, 9, 14, 19, 24, 29, 34, 39, 44, 49, None)]
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+1, you are right! thanks gnibbler. –  YOU Jan 25 '10 at 4:14

Uses grouper():

def chunks(seq, num):
  return grouper(int(math.ceil(len(seq) / float(num))), seq)
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1  
thanks -- is there a way to do this without a filler at all? I.e. have the last list not be the same size as the previous. –  user248237dfsf Jan 25 '10 at 3:31
    
Not with this method. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 25 '10 at 3:39
    
This doesn't completely work. Try chunks([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 4) –  mVChr Aug 18 at 20:12

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