Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a genericised class that I wish to subclass as follows:

public class SomeTable<T extends BaseTableEntry>
    extends BaseTable<T>
{

    public SomeTable(int rows, int cols)
    {
        super(rows, cols, SomeTableEntry.class);
        //Does not compile:
        //Cannot find symbol: constructor BaseTable(int, int, java.lang.Class<blah.blah.SomeTableEntry.class>)
    }
}

... where the genericised superclass is:

public class BaseTable<T extends BaseTableEntry>
{

    public BaseTable(int rows, int cols, Class<T> clasz)
    {
        ...
    }
...
}

I understand the compiler error, but cannot seem to find a workaround, other than to include an extra parameter in the SomeTable constructor.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
does the subclass also need to be generic? Or can it be SomeTable extends BaseTable<SomeTableEntry>? –  Thilo Jan 25 '10 at 4:03
    
No, SomeTable does not need to be genericised, public class SomeTable extends BaseTable<SomeTableEntry> is fine. –  bguiz Jan 25 '10 at 5:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This compiles:

public class SomeTable extends BaseTable<SomeTableEntry> {
    public SomeTable(int rows, int cols)
    {
        super(rows, cols, SomeTableEntry.class);
    }
}

It works with a cast:

public class SomeTable<T extends BaseTableEntry> extends BaseTable<T> {
    public SomeTable(int rows, int cols)
    {
        super(rows, cols, (Class<T>)SomeTableEntry.class);
    }
}

but I'm looking forward to someone posting the explanation for why the compiler requires the cast for the class.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. If he really needs SomeTable to be generic as well, I think he will have to duplicate the superclass constructor with the extra Class<T> parameter. –  Thilo Jan 25 '10 at 4:13
    
@SteveB.: Just to make sure that the programmer knows what he/she is doing. super(rows, cols, (Class<T>)Object.class) will also work, but by doing a cast you are taking the responsibility`. –  Adeel Ansari Jan 25 '10 at 4:20
    
Re: cast: There is compile warning "unsafe cast" with that cast... –  Thilo Jan 25 '10 at 4:22
    
Okay, here is a stab at explanation. Since SomeTable is generic, he could declare another subclass SubTable extends SomeTable<SpecialEntry>. In this case, the hard-coded SomeTableEntry would not work anymore, because the expected erased type would now be SpecialEntry. So in conclusion, he must either make SubTable non-generic, or propagate the extra class parameter to the next generation. –  Thilo Jan 25 '10 at 4:28
    
Actually, no need for another subclass at all. He can just write SomeTable<CompletelyUnrelatedBaseTableEntry> x = new SomeTable<CompletelyUnrelatedBaseTableEntry>(row,col) and be in trouble. –  Thilo Jan 25 '10 at 4:36

It is possible to define the SomeTable constructor generically if you pass Class to it the same way as you do with the base class:

public class BaseTable<T extends BaseTableEntry>
{
    public BaseTable(int rows, int cols, Class<? extends T> clazz)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

class SomeTable<T extends BaseTableEntry>
extends BaseTable<T>
{
    public SomeTable(int rows, int cols, Class<? extends T> clazz)
    {
        super(rows, cols, clazz);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.