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How would i go about finding the value of the two-byte two’s complement value 0xFF72 is"?

  1. Would i start by converting 0xFF72 to binary?
  2. reverse the bits.
  3. add 1 in binary notation. // lost here.
  4. write decimal.

I just dont know..

Also,

What about an 8 byte double that has the value: 0x7FF8000000000000. Its value as a floating point?

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3  
You are asking several question at once (pretty homeworky questions, too). There is no relationship that I know of between IEEE 754 and the 2's complement of an integer. For the value of your 8 bytes, why don't you write it through the long long field in an union that also has a double field in a small C program (with a compiler where long long are 64-bit)? –  Pascal Cuoq Jan 25 '10 at 5:20
    
Looks to me like you're asking two questions here, without separating them well. The title is misleading. As far as IEEE 754 goes, there is no reversal of the bits, and putting the twos-complement immediately after the floating-point question is confusing. –  David Thornley Jan 25 '10 at 15:15
    
@David, Corey: I edited the title to try to clear up David's concerns. Feel free to roll it back. –  Stephen Canon Jan 25 '10 at 15:50
    
@Stephen, Corey: I edited the question to put all the twos-complement stuff together. Again, Corey, feel free to click on "edit" and select the original version from the popup menu near the top to roll back if you like. –  David Thornley Jan 25 '10 at 17:06
    
This is not homework.. This was a question on a quiz 2 weeks ago that i missed and wanted to learn how to do –  Steller Jan 26 '10 at 18:49

3 Answers 3

Step 3 just means add 1 to the value. It's really as simple as it sounds. :-)

Example with 0xFF72 (assumed 16-bits here):

  1. First, invert it: 0x008D (each digit is simply 0xF minus the original value)
  2. Then add 1: 0x008E
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I would think that this was homework, but for the particular double that is listed. 0x7FF8000000000000 is a quiet NaN per the IEEE-754 spec, not a very interesting value to put on a homework assignment:

  • The sign bit is clear.
  • The exponent field is 0x7ff, the largest possible exponent, which means that the number is either an infinity or a NaN.
  • The significand field is 0x8000000000000. Since it isn't zero, the number is not an infinity, and must be a NaN. Since the leading bit is set, it is a quiet NaN, not a so-called "signaling NaN".
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This is not homework.. This was a question on a quiz 2 weeks ago that i missed and wanted to learn how to do –  Steller Jan 26 '10 at 18:44

This sounds like homework and for openness you should tag it as such if it is.

As for interpreting an 8 byte (double) floating point number, take a look at this Wikipedia article.

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This is not homework.. This was a question on a quiz 2 weeks ago that i missed and wanted to learn how to do –  Steller Jan 26 '10 at 18:44

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