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Given a list

l = [1,7,3,5]

I want to iterate over all pairs of consecutive list items (1,7),(7,3),(3,5), i.e.

for i in xrange(len(l)-1):
    x=l[i]
    y=l[i+1]
    # do something

I would like to do this in a more compact way, like for (x,y) in someiterator(l): ..., is there a way to do do this using some builtin python iterators? I'm sure the itertools module should have a solution, but I just can't figure it out...

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2  
Although I acceppted sberry's answer, as I asked for a simple builtin-based solution, also consider the elegant and more performant solutions by thefourtheye and HansZauber. –  flonk Jan 23 '14 at 9:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Just use zip

>>> l = [1, 7, 3, 5]
>>> for first, second in zip(l, l[1:]):
...     print first, second
...
1 7
7 3
3 5

As suggested you might consider using the izip function in itertools for very long lists where you don't want to create a new list.

import itertools

for first, second in itertools.izip(l, l[1:]):
    ...
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1  
Meh... in Python 2, zip() returns a new list. Better use itertools.izip(). –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 23 '14 at 8:47
5  
In Python 3, zip() returns an iterator. Better use Python 3. –  Noctua Jan 23 '14 at 8:49
    
Thanks, but shouldn't it be zip(l[:-1], l[1:]) instead zip(l, l[1:])? –  flonk Jan 23 '14 at 8:52
2  
This creates a copy of l (almost all of its elements) with no reason. –  Bach Jan 23 '14 at 8:52
    
OK, your comment below answers that... :) –  flonk Jan 23 '14 at 8:52

Look at pairwise at itertools recipes: http://docs.python.org/2/library/itertools.html#recipes

Quoting from there:

def pairwise(iterable):
    "s -> (s0,s1), (s1,s2), (s2, s3), ..."
    a, b = tee(iterable)
    next(b, None)
    return izip(a, b)

A General Version

A general version, that yields tuples of any given positive natural size, may look like that:

def nwise(iterable, n=2):                                                      
    iters = tee(iterable, n)                                                     
    for i, it in enumerate(iters):                                               
        next(islice(it, i, i), None)                                               
    return izip(*iters)   
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I would create a generic grouper generator, like this

def grouper(input_list, n = 2):
    for i in xrange(len(input_list) - (n - 1)):
        yield input_list[i:i+n]

Sample run 1

for first, second in grouper([1, 7, 3, 5, 6, 8], 2):
    print first, second

Output

1 7
7 3
3 5
5 6
6 8

Sample run 1

for first, second, third in grouper([1, 7, 3, 5, 6, 8], 3):
    print first, second, third

Output

1 7 3
7 3 5
3 5 6
5 6 8
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You could use a zip.

>>> list(zip(range(5), range(2, 6)))
[(0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5)]

Just like a zipper, it creates pairs. So, to to mix your two lists, you get:

>>> l = [1,7,3,5]
>>> list(zip(l[:-1], l[1:]))
[(1, 7), (7, 3), (3, 5)]

Then iterating goes like

for x, y in zip(l[:-1], l[1:]):
    pass
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You don't need to trim the end of the first one as zip will only make complete groups. That would be different if you were using izip_longest, but then why would you do that. –  sberry Jan 23 '14 at 8:50
    
@sberry: You are correct, but I like it better explicit, this way. It's something personal, I guess. –  Noctua Jan 23 '14 at 8:51
    
fair enough. It certainly isn't incorrect. –  sberry Jan 23 '14 at 8:52

Use reduce as follows:

l = [1,7,3,5]

reduce(doSomethingFunction, l)

It will operate as this example:

reduce(lambda x, y: x*y,l)

will do ((((1*7)*3))*5)

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