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I created a method that will add the sum of all numbers between and including two given numbers, but for some reason it doesn't work.

public static int sumOfAll(int one, int two)
{
    int bigNumber;
    int smallNumber;
    if(one < two){
        bigNumber = two;
        smallNumber = one;
    }
    else{
        bigNumber = one;
        smallNumber = two;
    }

    return ((smallNumber + bigNumber) / 2) * (bigNumber - smallNumber + 1);
}

That is the method and this is how I declared the method.

System.out.println(MathOp.sumOfAll(100, 1));

For some reason the result that is printed is 5000 when it should be 5050. The algorithm I used is right I tested it on wolframalpha. I don't know why it isn't working here and any help would be awesome!

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10  
Guess what would happen when you divide two ints by saying: 101/2? – devnull Jan 23 '14 at 9:08
3  
wow... I am such an idiot... – Ian Lundberg Jan 23 '14 at 9:09
    
Perform the division last. – zmbq Jan 23 '14 at 9:10
1  
You can simplify that using Math.abs – tobias_k Jan 23 '14 at 9:10
public static int sumOfAll(int one, int two)
{
    int bigNumber=Math.max(one,two);
    int smallNumber=Math.min(one,two);
    return ((bigNumber+1-smallNumber)*(bigNumber+smallNumber))/2;
}
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Why don't you use the summtion formula?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summation

http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/a/7/4/a74f603449dc34d308b50bbb6acaba1a.png

In for this just change your return code to

return (bigNumber*(bigNumber+1)-smallNumber*(smallNumber-1))/2;
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1  
There are actually cases where the OP's method will work, but where this method will give an integer overflow. The OP's method will be better than this, if he changes it to do the division last. – David Wallace Jan 23 '14 at 9:22

can you try

return (int)(((double)(smallNumber + bigNumber) / 2) * (bigNumber - smallNumber + 1));

reason being

as @devnull pointed out, when you do ((smallNumber + bigNumber) / 2), the decimal part gets chucked off since they get typecast to int. So an explicit cast to (double) is required before doing multiplication

share|improve this answer
    
There is a much better way of doing it than casting to double. More type safe, and don't use floating point arithmetics when it is not needed to (since here it's 2, the floating point arithmetic will behave as expected - but as a practice, floating points don't always deal as you expect when later converting to ints - due to inaccuracies). See: What every Computer scientist should know about floating poins – amit Jan 23 '14 at 9:15
    
@amit - this is perfectly fine. Any number that can be represented as an int will be represented exactly as a double. – David Wallace Jan 23 '14 at 9:17
    
@DavidWallace the problem is with division and later casting. it works for specific case of division by 2, but fails for other numbers. Example: (int)(((float)1)/3 * 3). To lesser importance - it is also less efficient than the alternative solution, due to the need to cast and work with floating points arithmetics - which are slower on some machines. – amit Jan 23 '14 at 9:19
    
Sure, but he's not dividing by other numbers. For THIS problem, this solution is fine. Any other solution is NOT "a much better way of doing it", as you put it. – David Wallace Jan 23 '14 at 9:24
    
@DavidWallace IMO, any answer that suggests using floating points instead of integers should at least warn that it works only for this case and why, otherwise it might advocate readers to use floating points without knowing what they're doing. – amit Jan 23 '14 at 9:30

You can try by changing int to double

public static double sumOfAll(int one, int two)
    {
        double bigNumber;
        double smallNumber;
        if (one < two)
        {
            bigNumber = two;
            smallNumber = one;
        }
        else
        {
            bigNumber = one;
            smallNumber = two;
        }

        return ((smallNumber + bigNumber) / 2) * (bigNumber - smallNumber + 1);
    }
share|improve this answer

First of all, you don't need to add more lines of code, change the returning type of your method or change your algorithm.

Background

When you are dividing numbers, in some cases, the result is integer. For example 2 / 1 = 2 or 33 / 11 = 3. In other cases the result is not an integer like 3 / 2 = 1.5 or 10 / 9 = 1.11...

In JAVA, if you try to make arithmetic operations with numbers that are ALL integers, the result will yield and integer value. For example 2 + 3 / 5 = 2 + 0.6. But since 3 and 5 are both integers, JAVA automatically truncates the decimal part of the result. At the end it is 2 + 0 = 2.

How this problem is solved?

Since your method calculates an "inclusive summation of numbers from a to b", it is known that the result will yield an integer value. But the return statement contain arithmetic operations that could yield double values. In that case you force the result to take double values for the moment by adding a ".0" to the end of the numbers there, in this case 2 and 1:

return ((smallNumber + bigNumber) / 2) * (bigNumber - smallNumber + 1);

And that become:

return ((smallNumber + bigNumber) / 2.0) * (bigNumber - smallNumber + 1.0);

Since the the method must return and integer, value the returned value must be cast back to integer:

return (int) (((smallNumber + bigNumber) / 2.0) * (bigNumber - smallNumber + 1.0));

Result

public static int sumOfAll(int one, int two){
        int bigNumber;
        int smallNumber;
        if(one < two){
            bigNumber = two;
            smallNumber = one;
        }
        else{
            bigNumber = one;
            smallNumber = two;
        }

        return (int) (((smallNumber + bigNumber) / 2.0) * (bigNumber - smallNumber + 1.0));
    }

Some Inputs and Outputs
Input: sumOfAll(100,1) --------------------- Output: 5050
Input: sumOfAll(25,5) ----------------------- Output: 315
Input: sumOfAll(1000,100) ----------------- Output: 495550
Input: sumOfAll(80,3) ----------------------- Output: 3237
Input: sumOfAll(7795,7) -------------------- Output: 30384889

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