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so there is my problem, it is a very trivial one I assume but I can't for the life of me find a solution.

I want to learn to use awk to manipulate text files. I know python and can use it to this effect but I've been told by my supervisor that i was to use Awk.

I am experimenting on cygwin at home but in the end I will work with UNIX

My probelm is with basic Awk syntax. I want to write my awk script in a text file and call it from the command line in the following way.

./scirptname filename

when I'm using a very simple Helloworld script there is no problem.
Now I want to try and search for a line containing the a keyword.
My script looks like this

#! /bin/awk

BEGIN {

}
{
    '/keyword/ {print}'
}

when I attempt to run it on a file know contains this keyword I get the following error message

gawk: cmd. line:1: ./test1
gawk: cmd. line:1: ^ syntax error
gawk: cmd. line:1: ./test1
gawk: cmd. line:1:   ^ unterminated regexp

So once again, sorry to bother you with this very simple and trivial question, but how do I feed a file name to my script and have my script perform the task I want it to perform on that file.
I don't want to make a one liner from shell, what I would like to do on those files is a bit too complex for that (in my ignorant uneducated opinion).
I would really really apreciate the help.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Problem one:

You didn't understand awk's pattern and actions well. google some tutorial and read that part.

like : http://www.chemie.fu-berlin.de/chemnet/use/info/gawk/gawk_9.html

in your awk file, you should either have:

#! /bin/awk -f
BEGIN {} {if(/keyword/) {print}}

or

#! /bin/awk -f
BEGIN {} /keyword/ {print}

in fact, the above line could be shorten into (assume you need the BEGIN block):

#!/bin/awk -f
BEGIN {} /keyword/

Problem two:

the hashbang line need -f so :

#!/bin/awk -f

then you could under same dir, do:

./myawk.awk inputfile
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I tried this and now I am getting gawk: ligne de commande:1: ./test1 gawk: ligne de commande:1: ^ syntax error gawk: ligne de commande:1: ./test1 gawk: ligne de commande:1: ^ expression rationnelle non refermée last line would translate into rational expression not closed or something of that order. (I don't knwo why cygwin is in french must have missed an option but it is annoying) –  Dronan Jan 23 at 9:50
    
oops @Dronan I updated the answer, you had another problem in hashbang line. –  Kent Jan 23 at 10:12
    
Perfect, works like a charm, thanks a lot. Quick question, what is the role of -f ? –  Dronan Jan 23 at 14:45
    
@Dronan use the current file as program file read the referenced link and man page ! –  Kent Jan 23 at 14:50

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