Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone explain what sort -k 1,1 and sort -k 1,2 does?

$ echo -e "9 3 5\n8 2 6\n7 4 1\n"
9 3 5
8 2 6
7 4 1

$ echo -e "9 3 5\n8 2 6\n7 4 1\n" | sort -k 2 -t " " -i
8 2 6
9 3 5
7 4 1

$ echo -e "9 3 5\n8 2 6\n7 4 1\n" | sort -k 1,1 -t " " -i
7 4 1
8 2 6
9 3 5

$ echo -e "9 3 5\n8 2 6\n7 4 1\n" | sort -k 1,2 -t " " -i
7 4 1
8 2 6
9 3 5
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Quoting from man sort:

   -k, --key=POS1[,POS2]
          start  a  key at POS1 (origin 1), end it at POS2 (default end of
          line).  See POS syntax below

So:

-k 2

would start at key 2 until the end of the line.

-k 1,1

would start at key 1 and end at key 1. Likewise for -k 1,2.


Your sample input doesn't show the difference, but if you were to modify it slightly then it might be more clear:

$ echo -e "9 3 5\n9 2 6\n7 4 1" | sort -k1,1 -t' '
7 4 1
9 2 6
9 3 5
$ echo -e "9 3 5\n9 2 6\n7 4 1" | sort -k1,2 -t' '
7 4 1
9 2 6
9 3 5
$ echo -e "9 3 5\n9 2 6\n7 4 1" | sort -k1,1 -t' ' -s
7 4 1
9 3 5
9 2 6

Particularly observe case 1 and 3. The output in case 1 was affected even when the sort was to be applied to key 1. Use the -s option in order to stabilize the sort:

   -s, --stable
          stabilize sort by disabling last-resort comparison
share|improve this answer

Note the --debug option to GNU sort available since version 8.6 (2010-10-15)

$ echo -e "9 3 5\n8 2 6\n7 4 1" | sort --debug -k 2 -t " " -i
sort: using `en_US.utf8' sorting rules
8 2 6
___
_____
9 3 5
___
_____
7 4 1
___
_____
$ echo -e "9 3 5\n8 2 6\n7 4 1" | sort --debug -k 1,1 -t " " -i
sort: using `en_US.utf8' sorting rules
7 4 1
_
_____
8 2 6
_
_____
9 3 5
_
_____
$ echo -e "9 3 5\n8 2 6\n7 4 1" | sort --debug -k 1,2 -t " " -i
sort: using `en_US.utf8' sorting rules
7 4 1
___
_____
8 2 6
___
_____
9 3 5
___
_____

Note the last _ in each line showing a second comparison used on the whole line is the sort of last resort and can be suppressed using the -s option

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.