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Getting an error message "Nested functions are disabled, use -fnested" etc in XCode/ObjC.

Here's the code (balls is an NSMutableArray pointing at a bunch of UIViews).

CGPoint pos=[[self.balls objectAtIndex:pointidx] center];

But the following seems to compile ok.

UIView *ref=[self.balls objectAtIndex:pointidx];
CGPoint pos=ref.center;

Should I use "-fnested-functions to re-enable (and if so where do I put the "-fnested-functions")? Or should I just put up with additional step of creating a UIView* pointer first? ty.

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Error messages are not brilliant for objective-c and xcode :) –  willcodejavaforfood Jan 25 '10 at 8:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Generally when you see nested functions warnings, what you really have is a syntax error.

Is pointidx an integer and balls an NSArray? Also, do you have a property for balls? Try just balls instead of self.balls.

Edit: Since it's a compile time thing, I'm thinking maybe it doesn't like passing center to NSObject. What happens if you cast the object:

CGPoint pos=[(UIView *)([self.balls objectAtIndex:pointidx]) center];

Irrelevant musing obfuscated.

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You are completely right, I need to check my syntax before I jump to ask questions! A missing semi-colon on a previous line. thanks... –  Nigel Jan 25 '10 at 7:49
    
Again not a problem. Xcode has some very strange ways of telling you when you do something wrong. It got a lot better recently, but it can still be puzzling. Also, clang is now built in, so if you have trouble with the compiler warnings, clang can sometimes be clearer about the problem. Use Build > Build and Analyze to see clang's report. Also useful for detecting memory leaks and dead code. –  David Kanarek Jan 25 '10 at 7:51

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