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We are at the very beginning of a project to convert code from C++ to C#. A co-worker proposed a list class that would contain a List<T> member. He didn't derive from List<T> because he needs to do some validation before an item is allowed to be added to the list.

For a little while, I thought deriving the custom list from CollectionBase might help, but I read that CollectionBase is obsolete now that we have generic classes. One post I found here said that a user with similar question should derive from List<T> and perform validation in the derived class, but it didn't say how to do that.

For example, let's say I want a list that will contain only even integers. How would I implement a check that would make sure an integer is even before I add it to the list?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You'll have to implement IList<T>. Deriving from List<T> wouldn't be enough, as methods such as Add are not overridable - you could give up inheritance and hide the base class implementation, but that's... dirty. And unsafe.

So just implement IList<T> and use composition:

public class EvenIntsList : IList<int>
{
    private readonly IList<int> _list; 

    public EvenIntsList()
    {
        _list = new List<int>();
    }

    public void Add(int item)
    {
        if(item % 2 == 0)
            _list.Add(item);
        else
            throw new ArgumentException("This list only allows even integers.", "item");
    }
}

You'll also have to provide pass-through implementations for the other IList<T> methods, like:

public IEnumerable<int> GetEnumerable()
{
    return _list.GetEnumerable();
}
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There are a few of limitations with this approach that the OP should be made aware of. For example, you won't be able to enumerate your collection without also implementing IEnumerable<T>/IEnumerable i.e. foreach (var item in myIntList). –  James Jan 23 at 14:13
    
@James I've added a note, thanks. I wouldn't consider that a "limitation" though - more like a nuisance. –  dcastro Jan 23 at 14:17
    
I say limitation because effectively by default you won't be able to do very common enumerator calls, however, you can of course update your structure to implement them. Again though, I would argue it's simpler to just derive from List<T> directly and get it all for free. –  James Jan 23 at 14:19
1  
Actually, by implementing IList<T> you'll be forced to implement GetEnumerator - so it's not a matter of being limited to not having an enumerator, it's about the nuisance of being forced to implement a pass-through method. –  dcastro Jan 23 at 14:20
    
well if that's the case then your example is misleading because it's not quite as simple as overriding one method as your example suggests (although I see you have mentioned that in the comments after). –  James Jan 23 at 14:24
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Although I consider it a bad technique to do things in collections other than storing data I would do the following:

  • Create a new class and implement IList<>
  • Use a List<> as an underlying collection (there is no reason to reinvent the wheel)
  • In Add() method I would do the validation
  • I would use a delegate for validation to make the list as reusable as possible

Something like that:

public class ValidatedList<T> : IList<T>
{       
    private Func<T, bool> validator;
    private List<T> list = new List<T>();

    public ValidatedList()
    {
    }

    public Func<T, bool> Validator
    {
        get { return validator; }
        set { validator = value; }
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        if (validator != null && validator(item))
        {
            list.Add(item);
        }
    }

    //other IList<> methods go here
}

Depending on how "aggressive" you want to make your list, you could throw an exception if the validation fails or allow the item to be added in the list if the validator is not set (I don't add the item in this sample).

Edit

Also as suggested by dcastro, having the validator in a property causes other implications such as changing the validator might invalidate items already in the list. It can be added through the constructor and the property can be skipped.

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Good flexible approach. I would make the validator a constructor argument. Being able to change the validator after the list has been created will lead to all sorts of problems (such as having to re-filter the collection, possible discarding items that were once valid, but are now invalid, etc), and I can't see any use case that would require this. –  dcastro Jan 23 at 14:54
    
@dcastro That's a good observation indeed but since you mentioned it, I cannot imagine any use of such a class in general, since it's not good at all to have classes responsible for more than one thing. Anyway, I will add it as a suggestion right below the one I wrote for the exception. –  Stelios Adamantidis Jan 23 at 17:26
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How about something like a generic base class with an abstract validation method to implement for any custom list you want?

you could then inherit from any additional interfaces you want to make public from the internal list. (such as IList)

Obviously you would need to add some more validation..

    /// <summary>
    /// Abstract Generic base class
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Type</typeparam>
    public abstract class CustomList<T>
    {
        private List<T> _list;

        public CustomList()
        {
            _list = new List<T>();
        }

        public T this[int i]
        {
            get
            {
                return _list[i];
            }
        }

        public void Add(T item)
        {
            if (this.ValidateItem(item))
                _list.Add(item);
            else
                throw new ApplicationException("Your exception here");
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Validation method
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="item"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        protected abstract bool ValidateItem(T item);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Int list type
    /// </summary>
    public class IntCustomList : CustomList<int>
    {
        protected override bool ValidateItem(int item)
        {
            return item % 2 == 0;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Test class
    /// </summary>
    public class Test
    {
        public void Test()
        {

            IntCustomList list = new IntCustomList();

            list.Add(1);
            list.Add(2);
        }
    }
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