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A few days ago I had to use C and when working with pointers I got a little surprise.

An example in C:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void GetPointer(int* p) {
  p = malloc( sizeof(int) );
  if(p) {
    *p = 7;
     printf("IN GetPointer: %d\n",*p);
  } else {
    printf("MALLOC FAILED IN GetPointer\n");
  }
}

void GetPointer2(int* p) {
  if(p) {
    *p = 8;
     printf("IN GetPointer2: %d\n",*p);
  } else {
    printf("INVALID PTR IN GetPointer2");
  }
}

int* GetPointer3(void) {
  int* p = malloc(sizeof(int));
  if(p) {
    *p = 9;
    printf("IN GetPointer3: %d\n",*p);
  } else {
    printf("MALLOC FAILED IN GetPointer3\n");
  }
  return p;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  (void) argc;
  (void) argv;
  int* ptr = 0;
  GetPointer(ptr);
  if(!ptr) {
    printf("NOPE\n");
  } else {
    printf("NOW *PTR IS: %d\n",*ptr);
    free(ptr);
  }

  int* ptr2 = malloc(sizeof(int));
  GetPointer2(ptr2);
  if(ptr2) {
    printf("NOW *PTR2 IS: %d\n",*ptr2);
    free(ptr2);
  }

  int* ptr3 = GetPointer3();
  if(ptr3) {
    printf("NOW *PTR3 IS: %d\n",*ptr3);
    free(ptr3);
  }
  return 0;
}

The output:

IN GetPointer: 7
NOPE
IN GetPointer2: 8
NOW *PTR2 IS: 8
IN GetPointer3: 9
NOW *PTR3 IS: 9

In this example, the first pointer will only have "value" inside the GetPointer method. Why using malloc inside lasts only for the lifetime of the method?

I tried this in C++ and got the same behaviour. I thought it would retain its value, but no. I found a way through, though:

void GetPointer(int*& p) {
  p = new int;
  if(p) {
    *p = 7;
     printf("IN GetPointer: %d\n",*p);
  } else {
    printf("MALLOC FAILED IN GetPointer\n");
  }
}

In C I can't do this trick. Is there a way to do the same in C or I have to be careful and "malloc" the pointer before attempting to give it a value?

share|improve this question
2  
pointer to pointer. – Luchian Grigore Jan 23 '14 at 14:37
1  
You need to pass in int** p if you want to return the address of the allocated memory. – OldProgrammer Jan 23 '14 at 14:37
    
you Need of Pointer to pointer – Grijesh Chauhan Jan 23 '14 at 14:38
1  
As with many C questions on StackOverflow, you should go back to basics. A pointer is a value. Calling a function copies the argument's value to the variable declared by the formal parameter. A pointer is a value that has the property that the indirection operator * produces a variable. The & operator does the opposite: takes a variable and produces a pointer value. Now you have all the facts you need to explain the observed behaviours. Everything follows logically from those simple principles. – Eric Lippert Jan 23 '14 at 16:05
1  
You're welcome. The key thing to understand here is that assignment of one variable to another copies the value of the source variable to the storage associated with the target variable. This is true whether the assignment is due to an assignment operator or passing an argument that corresponds to a formal parameter. You are assuming that assigning one variable to another makes the two variables share a single storage. You have multiple variables all called p, but they all refer to different storage locations. – Eric Lippert Jan 23 '14 at 18:19
up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you want to reassign what the pointer points to in C, you have to use int**, ie a pointer to a pointer.

That is because pointers are copied by value as arguments, so if want the change made in the pointers pointee to be visible outside the scope of the function, you need another level of indirection.

share|improve this answer
3  
Or return the new pointer from the function. I would prefer to do that. – John Dibling Jan 23 '14 at 14:49

this

void GetPointer(int* p) {
  p = malloc( sizeof(int) );
  if(p) {
    *p = 7;
     printf("IN GetPointer: %d\n",*p);
  } else {
    printf("MALLOC FAILED IN GetPointer\n");
  }
}

does absolutely nothing part from creating a memory leak.

the reason it doesn't do anything is that you pass a copy of the pointer to the function (int* p), if you want to change what p points to you need to pass the address of the pointer instead.

void GetPointer(int** p)
share|improve this answer
void GetPointer(int** pp) {
    int *p = malloc( sizeof(int) );
    if(p) {
        *p = 7;
        printf("IN GetPointer: %d\n",*p);
    } else {
        printf("MALLOC FAILED IN GetPointer\n");
    }
    *pp = p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
mistake in *p = 7 here – nikpel7 Jan 23 '14 at 14:40
    
@nikpel7 No, it is valid. p is int *. – user694733 Jan 23 '14 at 14:42
    
I see the issue now, pp is the pointer to pointer, sorry for that! – nikpel7 Jan 23 '14 at 14:44

In void GetPointer(int* p) you are losing the pointer pointing to the dynamic memory as soon as you exit the function block.

Try using pointer to pointer approach:

GetPointer(int ** p) {
  *p = malloc( sizeof(int) );
  if(*p) {
    **p = 7;
     printf("IN GetPointer: %d\n",**p);
  } else {
    printf("MALLOC FAILED IN GetPointer\n");
  }
}
share|improve this answer
  p = malloc( sizeof(int) );

malloc( sizeof(int)); will return a pointer which is then assigned to p. But p is local to GetPointer,since the pointer itself is passed by value to it.

     +----+
     |    |
  xx +----+  malloc returns this block

     +----+
     |    |
  xx +----+  local variable p is assigned this block

     +----+
     |  7 |
  xx +----+  p modifies value of this block

Function ends and so does p leaving behind a memory leak

     +----+
     |  7 |
  xx +----+  No one points to it anymore

For GetPointer2 and GetPointer3 you do a malloc,

     +----+
     |    |
  yy +----+  malloc returns some other block
share|improve this answer

For the first call to GetPointer, you need to pass in a pointer to a pointer to an int. (unlike C++, which allows reference passing with the & operator in the function signature, C always passes things in by value, which means that your code is passing in a copy of ptr into the GetPointer function.) You need to pass in the address of that pointer (i.e. the location in memory where the pointer ptr is stored so that code inside the GetPointer method can put something in that location, thereby modifying ptr itself.

i.e. the call should be:

GetPointer(&ptr);

and the functions should look like:

void GetPointer(int** p) {
  *p = malloc( sizeof(int) );
  if(*p) {
    **p = 7;
     printf("IN GetPointer: %d\n",**p);
  } else {
    printf("MALLOC FAILED IN GetPointer\n");
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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