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I have an arbitrary number of equally sized elements which are floated left and separated by some right/bottom margin to display them in a grid. The size of the container holding the floated elements will vary depending on browser window size.

I would like to have the container set to width 100%, and have as many elements fit in a row as possible.

The problem I'm having is that the right margin of the right most element in each row has to be contained inside the the containing element, which means I don't always get as many floated elements as could fit in a row.

I can't just add width to the parent because I want to use width 100%, and removing margin from every nth element in the grid doesn't work because the number of elements in a row will vary depending on the width of the parent.

I suppose I could use jQuery to get the width of the container, calculate how many elements should fit and then remove margin appropriately, but I am hoping there is a more simple way to solve this.

For example, the code below shows 2 boxes per row, but I'd like there to be 3 (without just increasing the width of .wrap).

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
    body{
        margin:0;
    }
    .wrap {
        width: 400px;
        margin: 0 auto;
    }
    main {
        width: 100%;
    }
    .box{
        width: 100px;
        height: 100px;
        margin: 0 50px 50px 0;
        float: left;
        background-color: #999
    }
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div class='wrap'>
    <main>
        <div class="box">
            <p>Some content...</p>
        </div>
        <div class="box">
            <p>Some content...</p>
        </div>
        <div class="box">
            <p>Some content...</p>
        </div>
        <div class="box">
            <p>Some content...</p>
        </div>
        <div class="box">
            <p>Some content...</p>
        </div>
        <div class="box">
            <p>Some content...</p>
        </div>
    </main>
</div>

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1 Answer 1

This can be achieved by using a box-sizing hack. Edit your CSS so it includes:

.wrap {
  position: relative;
  padding: 0 25px;
}
.main {
  position: absolute;
  -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
  -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

What is happening here?

First we add the required size as padding to the wrapper. Because padding is out of the width-scope, it's added outside the 'box' and does not affecting the content width. Next we position .main absolute with respect to the relative position of .wrap. This way the absolute positioned element is not directly restricted by its relative parent.

Now, if we set the box-sizing to border-box, we order CSS to include padding and border into its width. So 100% width of its parent (which is 400px) and 50px of padding makes 450px which is the size you need for three boxes of 100px and 50px margin.

Your final CSS will be

body{
    margin:0;
}
.wrap {
    width: 400px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    padding: 0 25px;
    position: relative;
}
main {
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
}
.box{
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 0 50px 50px 0;
    float: left;
    background-color: #999
}
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