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I keep finding questions already asked that are close to mine, but can't seem to find the exact answer I'm looking for. I'm guessing the solution for what I want to do is fairly simple.

I have a web site with a default page (index.jsp). There is a link from the index page to an admin page (admin.jsp). This page has been password protected for a long time with Spring without issue. Here is the security context file I've been using:

<beans:beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/security"
             xmlns:beans="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
             xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
             xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans 
                    http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.1.xsd
                    http://www.springframework.org/schema/security 
                    http://www.springframework.org/schema/security/spring-security-3.1.xsd">

    <global-method-security pre-post-annotations="enabled" secured-annotations="enabled"/>     

    <http use-expressions="true">
        <intercept-url pattern="/admin.jsp" access="hasRole('administrator')" />
        <intercept-url pattern="/**" access="permitAll" />
        <form-login login-page="/login.jsp" default-target-url="/admin.jsp" />
        <logout />
    </http>

    <authentication-manager>
        <authentication-provider>
            <user-service>
                <user name="${admin.username}" password="${admin.password}" authorities="administrator" />
            </user-service>
        </authentication-provider>
    </authentication-manager>
</beans:beans>   

I now have a need to password protect index.jsp as well. If I duplicate the child elements for the element (and I created separate login.jsp files, not sure if that's necessary) like this:

<http use-expressions="true">
        <intercept-url pattern="/index.jsp" access="hasRole('user')" />
        <form-login login-page="/indexLogin.jsp" default-target-url="/index.jsp" />
        <logout />

        <intercept-url pattern="/admin.jsp" access="hasRole('administrator')" />
        <form-login login-page="/adminLogin.jsp" default-target-url="/admin.jsp" />
        <logout />
    </http>

    <authentication-manager>
        <authentication-provider>
            <user-service>
                <user name="${admin.username}" password="${admin.password}" authorities="administrator" />
                <user name="${user.username}" password="${user.password}" authorities="user" />
            </user-service>
        </authentication-provider>
    </authentication-manager>

Then the index.jsp is password protected exactly as expected. However, if I click on the button that opens the admin.jsp page in a new tab, i get a 403 - Access is denied error. I'm assuming that's because it's automatically trying to use the user credentials on the admin page.

I then tried creating two separate elements, each with the elements for each different page:

<http use-expressions="true">
        <intercept-url pattern="/index.jsp" access="hasRole('user')" />
        <form-login login-page="/indexLogin.jsp" default-target-url="/index.jsp" />
        <logout />
    </http>

    <http use-expressions="true">
        <intercept-url pattern="/admin.jsp" access="hasRole('administrator')" />
        <form-login login-page="/adminLogin.jsp" default-target-url="/admin.jsp" />
        <logout />
    </http>

Then I get an error stating:

java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: A universal match pattern ('/**') is defined before other patterns in the filter chain, causing them to be ignored. Please check the ordering in your namespace or FilterChainProxy bean configuration

Can anybody give me a pointer on how to force Spring to prompt for credentials each time it access either index.jsp or admin.jsp, and not assume that the existing credentials should be used?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You, probably, do not need Spring Security "to prompt for credentials each time it access either index.jsp or admin.jsp". It would not be a usual use case for Spring Security, and even if you manage to do it, it would make things much more complicated when they should be.

Instead, you can authenticate the user when s/he accesses any web page of your application (i.e. you prompt for ligin and password just once). When the user tries to access admin.jsp, you can use the user credential that you already have to allow or deny access to this page.

You need to replace access="permitAll" with access="hasRole('user')" in your original code. So your <http> tag should look as follows:

<http use-expressions="true">
    <intercept-url pattern="/admin.jsp" access="hasRole('administrator')" />
    <intercept-url pattern="/**" access="hasRole('user')" />
    <form-login login-page="/login.jsp" default-target-url="/admin.jsp" />
    <logout />
</http>

Also, keep your own changes in the <authentication-manager> tag, but replace authorities="administrator" with authorities="user,administrator":

<authentication-manager>
    <authentication-provider>
        <user-service>
            <user name="${admin.username}" password="${admin.password}" authorities="user,administrator" />
            <user name="${user.username}" password="${user.password}" authorities="user" />
        </user-service>
    </authentication-provider>
</authentication-manager>

Spring Security matches <intercept-url> rules in the order in which they are defined. First, it will check whether the page that is requested matches the /admin.jsp pattern. If it does, hasRole('administrator') will be used as the access rule for this page. All the other pages will match /** pattern. As all authenticated users (including the administrator) belong to the user role, all other pages will be available to any authenticated user.

You cannot use more than one <form-login> or <logout> tag inside <http>. I also doubt you can define more than one <http> section in your Spring config.

See the Spring Security Reference for more details on configuring Spring Security.

UPDATE

Also, replace default-target-url="/admin.jsp" with default-target-url="/index.jsp" because you do not want ordinary (non-admin) users to be redirected to admin.jsp.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand the concept you're explaining and I like it, however, when I follow what you outlined, I get the following in browser: "The page isn't redirecting properly. Firefox has detected that the server is redirecting the request for this address in a way that will never complete." When I access the default url, I'm redirected to the welcome-file file (index.jsp), and I can see in the address bar that I am being redirected to login.jsp. That's when I see the error in Firefox. –  Bal Jan 24 '14 at 14:43
    
Simply changing <intercept-url pattern="/**" access="hasRole('user')" /> to <intercept-url pattern="/index.jsp*" access="hasRole('user')" /> fixed the issue! –  Bal Jan 24 '14 at 14:55

Try to use 'access-denied-handler' like this :

<http ...>
    ...
    <access-denied-handler error-page="the page you want to redirect to"/>
</http>
share|improve this answer
    
So should I use two separate <http> elements, one to define each page that needs secured? If so, how do I get around the "A universal match pattern..." exception? –  Bal Jan 23 '14 at 23:24
    
No, only one <http> element, and now, instead of getting '403 - Access is denied error' you will get the eorror-page you configured –  Rida BENHAMMANE Jan 24 '14 at 1:00

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