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I am currently trying to write a list of pairs. my code is :

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <list>
using namespace std;

list<pair<string,char>> listPair;
list<pair<string,char>>::iterator it;
void printStars(list<pair<string,char>> listPair)
{

  for (it=listPair.begin(); it != listPair.end(); it++)
    cout << it->first <<" ";
  cout << endl;
}
int main()
{
    pair<string,char> mypair;
    listPair.push_back(make_pair("bib",'a'));
    listPair.push_back(make_pair("bob",'b'));
    for_each(listPair.begin(), listPair.end(), printStars);
    return 0;
}

Compilation fails with:

error C2664: 'void (std::list<_Ty>)' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'std::pair<_Ty1,_Ty2>' to 'std::list<_Ty>'

Can you please help me detect where exactly is the problem?

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3  
You didn't #include <string>. –  chris Jan 23 at 23:56
2  
Nor <utility>. –  Kerrek SB Jan 23 at 23:56
    
@chris : oh ya ,thanks. –  user3140486 Jan 24 at 0:40

2 Answers 2

Your problem is, your printStars() expects a list, however for_each passes it each item, not the actual list:

Working code :

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <list>
#include <string>
#include <utility>

list<pair<string,char> > listPair;
list<pair<string,char> >::iterator it;
void printStars(const pair<string,char> & listPair){ //notice the &, so it would pass by reference and not make a new copy of the pair.
    cout << listPair.first << ' ';

}
int main() {
    pair<string,char> mypair;
    listPair.push_back(make_pair("bib",'a'));
    listPair.push_back(make_pair("bob",'b'));
    for_each(listPair.begin(), listPair.end(), printStars);
    cout << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
oh yes, that's exactly that I want , thanks a lot. @OneOfOne –  user3140486 Jan 24 at 0:54

The functor you pass to std::for_each is expected to accept an element of the range you pass into std::for_each. Your last has pair<string,char> elements, so your functor should have a signature like: void printStars(const pair<string,char>& elem).

In addition, to pass a plain function to std::for_each you need to use std::ref or (on an old compiler) std::ptr_fun.

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <list>
#include <string> // missing include
#include <utility>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

typedef list< pair<string,char> > list_t;
list_t listPair;
void printStars(list_t::reference x) // use a reference, otherwise you create a copy
{
  cout << x.first << " " << x.second << endl;
}
int main()
{
    pair<string,char> mypair;
    listPair.push_back(make_pair("bib",'a'));
    listPair.push_back(make_pair("bob",'b'));
    for_each(listPair.begin(), listPair.end(), std::ref(printStars)); // C++11
    for_each(listPair.begin(), listPair.end(), std::ptr_fun(&printStars)); // C++98

    return 0;
}
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