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I can stop it but how would I make it start again at the current time on the start function? Why doesn't this work?

<!DOCTYPE>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
    <p id="demo"></p>
    <button onclick="stopFunction()">Stop time</button>
    <button onclick="startFunction()">Start time</button>
</body>
</html>

JavaScript:

var myVar = setInterval(function () {
    myTimer();
}, 1000);

function myTimer() {
    var d = new Date();
    var t = d.toLocaleTimeString();
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = t;
}

function stopFunction() {
    clearInterval(myVar);
}

function startFunction() {
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = t;
}
share|improve this question
    
in startFunction you need to re-set myVar to setInterval again. Also, in startFunction you reference t which isn't scoped to that function, so it will always be undefined. –  lemieuxster Jan 23 '14 at 23:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

edit: I threw in some code to disable the start button when it's running. It's a good idea to do this, or else write some logic in to not keep calling setInterval every time it's clicked/running

<!DOCTYPE>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
    <p id="demo"></p>
    <button id='stopButton' onclick="stopFunction()">Stop time</button>
    <button id='startButton' onclick="startFunction()">Start time</button>

<script type='text/javascript'>
var myVar;

function myTimer() {
    var d = new Date();
    var t = d.toLocaleTimeString();
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = t;
}

function stopFunction() {
    clearInterval(myVar);
    document.getElementById("startButton").disabled = false; 
}

function startFunction() {
  myVar = setInterval(myTimer, 1000);
  document.getElementById("startButton").disabled = true; 

}

startFunction();
</script>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
uh, your answer is 100% the same as mine... –  Don Rhummy Jan 24 '14 at 0:08
    
@DonRhummy not quite. even before my edit it wasn't exactly the same. –  Crayon Violent Jan 24 '14 at 0:16

Change it to this:

var t = d.toLocaleTimeString();

function myTimer()
{
    var d;

    d = new Date();
    t = d.toLocaleTimeString();
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = t;
}

var myVar = setInterval(myTimer, 1000);

function stopFunction()
{
    clearInterval(myVar);
}

function startFunction()
{
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = t;

    //Restart it here
    myVar = setInterval(myTimer, 1000); 
}

The problem was that you were not starting the interval again. This now does that.

share|improve this answer
    
This is good but "t" in startFunction() is undefined, because it's in the myTimer() function's scope. –  pid Jan 24 '14 at 0:10
    
@pid good catch. –  Don Rhummy Jan 24 '14 at 0:11
    
@DonRhummy there's actually no reason to even have that first line in startFunction since myTimer is going to update in a second anyway –  Crayon Violent Jan 24 '14 at 0:18
    
@CrayonViolent Not quite. The interval won't start for a full second, so they might want a new value the moment this function starts. –  Don Rhummy Jan 24 '14 at 0:19
    
@DonRhummy I said it's going to update in a second, yes. But that's the same delay as initial load anyways. IOW it's consistent. But this is splitting hairs –  Crayon Violent Jan 24 '14 at 0:21

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