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What does malloc(0) returns? Would the answer be same for realloc(malloc(0),0) ?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<malloc.h>
int main()
{
        printf("%p\n", malloc(0));
        printf("%p\n", realloc(malloc(0), 0));
        return 0;
}

Output from linux gcc:

manav@manav-workstation:~$ gcc -Wall mal.c
manav@manav-workstation:~$ ./a.out
0x9363008
(nil)
manav@manav-workstation:~$

The output keep changing everytime for malloc(0). Is this a standard answer? And why would anyone be interested in getting such a pointer, other than academic research?

EDIT:

If malloc(0) returns dummy pointer, then how does following works:

int main()
{
    void *ptr = malloc(0);
    printf("%p\n", realloc(ptr, 1024));
    return 0;
}

EDIT:

The following code outputs "possible" for every iteration. Why should it not fail ?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<malloc.h>
int main()
{

        int i;
        void *ptr;
        printf("Testing using BRUTE FORCE\n");
        for (i=0; i<65000; i++)
        {
                ptr = malloc(0);
                if (ptr == realloc(ptr, 1024))
                        printf("Iteration %d: possible\n", i);
                else
                {
                        printf("Failed for iteration %d\n", i);
                        break;
                }
        }
        return 0;
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Cole Johnson, torazaburo, Joe, Soner Gönül, Mark Rotteveel May 31 at 11:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
You seem to be giving C examples. Did you tag it C++ intentionally or by accident? They are two different languages, and the standards may be different here. –  David Thornley Jan 25 '10 at 16:00
    
@tommieb75: it helps to have answered the original question. Having said that, this question has two parts, and the second part is more interesting and not a dupe. See my answer to this question for details. –  Alok Singhal Jan 25 '10 at 20:18

10 Answers 10

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Others have answered how malloc(0) works. I will answer one of the questions that you asked that hasn't been answered yet (I think). The question is about realloc(malloc(0), 0):

What does malloc(0) return? Would the answer be same for realloc(malloc(0),0)?

The standard says this about realloc(ptr, size):

  • if ptr is NULL, it behaves like malloc(size),
  • otherwise (ptr is not NULL), it deallocates the old object pointer to by ptr and returns a pointer to a new allocated buffer. But if size is 0, C89 says that the effect is equivalent to free(ptr). Interestingly, I can't find that statement in C99 draft (n1256 or n1336). In C89, the only sensible value to return in that case would be NULL.

So, there are two cases:

  • malloc(0) returns NULL on an implementation. Then your realloc() call is equivalent to realloc(NULL, 0). That is equivalent to malloc(0) from above (and that is NULL in this case).
  • malloc(0) returns non-NULL. Then, the call is equivalent to free(malloc(0)). In this case, malloc(0) and realloc(malloc(0), 0) are not equivalent.

Note that there is an interesting case here: in the second case, when malloc(0) returns non-NULL on success, it may still return NULL to indicate failure. This will result in a call like: realloc(NULL, 0), which would be equivalent to malloc(0), which may or may not return NULL.

I am not sure if the omission in C99 is an oversight or if it means that in C99, realloc(ptr, 0) for non-NULL ptr is not equivalent to free(ptr). I just tried this with gcc -std=c99, and the above is equivalent to free(ptr).

Edit: I think I understand what your confusion is:

Let's look at a snippet from your example code:

ptr = malloc(0);
if (ptr == realloc(ptr, 1024))

The above is not the same as malloc(0) == realloc(malloc(0), 1024). In the second, the malloc() call is made twice, whereas in the first, you're passing a previously allocated pointer to realloc().

Let's analyze the first code first. Assuming malloc(0) doesn't return NULL on success, ptr has a valid value. When you do realloc(ptr, 1024), realloc() basically gives you a new buffer that has the size 1024, and the ptr becomes invalid. A conforming implementation may return the same address as the one already in ptr. So, your if condition may return true. (Note, however, looking at the value of ptr after realloc(ptr, 1024) may be undefined behavior.)

Now the question you ask: malloc(0) == realloc(malloc(0), 1024). In this case, let's assume that both the malloc(0) on the LHS and RHS returns non-NULL. Then, they are guaranteed to be different. Also, the return value from malloc() on the LHS hasn't been free()d yet, so any other malloc(), calloc(), or realloc() may not return that value. This means that if you wrote your condition as:

if (malloc(0) == realloc(malloc(0), 1024)
    puts("possible");

you won't see possible on the output (unless both malloc() and realloc() fail and return NULL).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
    void *p1;
    void *p2;

    p1 = malloc(0);
    p2 = realloc(p1, 1024);
    if (p1 == p2)
        puts("possible, OK");

    /* Ignore the memory leaks */
    if (malloc(0) == realloc(malloc(0), 1024))
        puts("shouldn't happen, something is wrong");
    return 0;
}

On OS X, my code didn't output anything when I ran it. On Linux, it prints possible, OK.

share|improve this answer
    
@Alok: Great job. I checked the condition on Linux if (malloc(0) == realloc(malloc(0), 1024). It is failing everytime ! –  Manav Jan 27 '10 at 12:34
    
When you say "failing", you mean the program above prints "shouldn't happen, something is wrong"? –  Alok Singhal Jan 27 '10 at 15:03
    
"The standard says this about realloc(ptr, size): if ptr is NULL, it behaves like malloc(size), otherwise (ptr is not NULL), it deallocates the old object pointer to by ptr and returns a pointer to a new allocated buffer." I feel I should mention that realloc only performs a free(ptr) if the memory area had to be moved, and if id didn't, no deallocation is performed, simply an expansion. At least that's what I understand from the man-page. "If the area pointed to was moved, a free(ptr) is done." –  Victor Zamanian Nov 16 '12 at 14:32

malloc(0) is Implementation Defined as far as C99 is concerned.

From C99 [Section 7.20.3]

The order and contiguity of storage allocated by successive calls to the calloc, malloc, and realloc functions is unspecified. The pointer returned if the allocation succeeds is suitably aligned so that it may be assigned to a pointer to any type of object and then used to access such an object or an array of such objects in the space allocated (until the space is explicitly deallocated). The lifetime of an allocated object extends from the allocation until the deallocation. Each such allocation shall yield a pointer to an object disjoint from any other object. The pointer returned points to the start (lowest byte address) of the allocated space. If the space cannot be allocated, a null pointer is returned. If the size of the space requested is zero, the behavior is implementation- defined: either a null pointer is returned, or the behavior is as if the size were some nonzero value, except that the returned pointer shall not be used to access an object.

share|improve this answer
7  
PJ Plauger (C Standard Committee member) in one of his articles said their were huge arguments about this, and in the end they chickened out and left it to the implementation. –  anon Jan 25 '10 at 13:21
4  
@Manav: it might be used as a tag-pointer: it's a pointer that's definitely distinct from any other valid pointer and that's not NULL. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 25 '10 at 13:21
2  
returning a non null pointer in the case of malloc(0) is consistent and helps distinguish it from the error case of returning NULL, which may be returned from any argument to malloc, e.g. malloc(4). –  Alex Brown Jan 25 '10 at 13:23
2  
@BlueRaja: that's their job, to argue the pros and cons of various proposals. In this case, always returning a null pointer is convenient for some people, whereas making a 0-sized allocation is convenient for others. The committee is supposed to consider both. Unfortunately the compromise they came up with only helps platform-specific code, and is useless to anyone trying to code portably. –  Steve Jessop Jan 25 '10 at 14:20
2  
@TMN: because "Each such allocation shall yield a pointer to an object disjoint from any other object." –  Bill Jan 25 '10 at 14:21

In C89, malloc(0) is implementation dependent - I don't know if C99 has fixed this or not. In C++, using:

char * p = new char[0];

is well defined - you get a valid, non-null pointer. Of course, you can't use the pointer to access what it points to without invoking undefined behaviour.

As to why this exists, it is convenient for some algorithms, and means you don't need to litter your code with tests for zero values.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Neil: malloc(0) is the same in C99. –  Alok Singhal Jan 25 '10 at 20:19
    
@Alok: that's just plain false. C99 allows malloc(0) to return 0, and good implementations do so. –  R.. Jul 25 '10 at 23:03
4  
@R. I think the point is that C99 doesn't require implementations to return 0 or non-0 for malloc(0). –  Alok Singhal Jul 26 '10 at 8:16

The comp.lang.c FAQ has the following to say:

The ANSI/ISO Standard says that it may do either; the behavior is implementation-defined (see question 11.33). Portable code must either take care not to call malloc(0), or be prepared for the possibility of a null return.

So, it's probably best to avoid using malloc(0).

share|improve this answer
1  
But the same pointer returned by malloc(0), if not NULL, can be used by realloc() to point to some valid memory location. Like realloc(malloc(0), 1024); –  Manav Jan 25 '10 at 13:11
3  
@Manav: It actually works with NULL too, realloc(NULL, 1024) is the same as malloc(1024) –  Hasturkun Jan 25 '10 at 13:26
    
Can ever malloc(0) and realloc(malloc(0), 1024) return same pointers ??? if (malloc(0) == realloc(malloc(0), 1024) printf("possible"); –  Manav Jan 25 '10 at 13:30

C99 standard

If the space cannot be allocated, a nullpointer is returned. If the size of the space requested is zero, the behavior is implementation-defined: either a null pointer is returned, or the behavior is as if the size were some nonzero value, except that the returned pointer shall not be used to access an object.

share|improve this answer

One point nobody cared to talk about yet, in your first program is that realloc with length 0 is the same thing as free.

from the Solaris man page:

 The realloc() function changes the size of the block pointed
 to by ptr to size bytes and returns a pointer to the (possi-
 bly moved) block. The contents will be unchanged up  to  the
 lesser  of  the new and old sizes. If ptr is NULL, realloc()
 behaves like malloc() for the specified size. If size  is  0
 and  ptr is not a null pointer, the space pointed to is made
 available for further allocation by the application,  though
 not returned to the system. Memory is returned to the system
 only upon termination of the application.

If one doesn't know that it can be a source of bad surprise (happened to me).

share|improve this answer
    
Funny, I mentioned this in the duplicate question here... stackoverflow.com/questions/2022335/whats-the-point-in-malloc0/… –  t0mm13b Jan 25 '10 at 16:11

See C99, section 7.20.3:

If the size of the space requested is zero, the behavior is implementationdefined: either a null pointer is returned, or the behavior is as if the size were some nonzero value, except that the returned pointer shall not be used to access an object.

This is valid for all three allocation functions (ie calloc(), malloc() and realloc()).

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I think it depends. I checked the Visual Studio 2005 sources and saw this in the _heap_alloc function:

if (size == 0)
    size = 1;

I think that in many cases you may want a valid pointer, even when asking for zero bytes. This is because this consistent behavior makes it easier to check your pointers because: if you have a non-NULL pointer it's OK; if you have a NULL pointer you probably have a problem. That's why I think that most implementations will return a valid pointer, even when asking for zero bytes.

share|improve this answer
    
I've often seen a general adjustment like size = (size+WORD_LEN)%WORD_LEN; This keeps the blocks in the heap word-aligned, which often improves access time (especially for block transfers). –  TMN Jan 25 '10 at 14:03
1  
The blocks in the heap will be more than word aligned in most systems; typically, all blocks will be aligned on a multiple of 8 bytes; many will be aligned on a multiple of 16 bytes. The return value must be sufficiently well aligned for any use. For many systems, that means that if it is used for a double, it must be aligned on a multiple of 8 bytes; for some systems, a long double may be 16 bytes, and so on. And even though Intel chips may handle misaligned data, there is a performance penalty in doing so which malloc() et al should - and do - avoid. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 26 '10 at 8:06

If malloc(0) returns dummy pointer, then how does following works:

void *ptr = malloc(0);

printf("%p\n", realloc(ptr, 1024));

I don't know what you mean by "dummy pointer". If malloc(0) returns non-NULL, then ptr is a valid pointer to a memory block of size zero. The malloc implementation saves this information in an implementation-specific way. realloc knows the (implementation-specific) way to figure out that ptr points to a memory block of size zero.

(How malloc/realloc/free do this is implementation-specific. One possibility is to allocate 4 bytes more than requested and store the size just before the memory block. In that case, ((int *)ptr)[-1] would give the memory block size, which is 0. You should never do this from your code, it's only for use by realloc and free).

share|improve this answer
    
@user9876: "If malloc(0) returns non-NULL, then ptr is a valid pointer to a memory block of size zero."... How do you allocate a valid memory block of size 'zero' as you said in your post? –  Manav Jan 25 '10 at 14:01
    
How does your user application do it? You call malloc(0) (if you're on a system where that returns non-NULL). How does the system implement that? That's a bit like asking how you can have a file on disk with a size of zero. It's still a valid file on disk, with all the usual metadata (directory entries etc), it just has a size of zero. –  user9876 Jan 27 '10 at 16:25

We've implemented malloc structures for embedded code with a header (and optional trailer). The header can contain extra debugging information, such as task handle that allocated it. Also, I like to have flags/boundaries like 0xA5A5A5A5, and 0x5A5A5A5A to help detect if someone somewhere has overwritten the bounds of their memory allocation(s). By keeping lists of free and used blocks, one can also periodically check heap integrity, and prevent operations (like free() of unallocated memory) that could cause things to "blow up".

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