Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was trying to execute the following query to get the count of index from my schema.

select count(*) from USER_INDEXES; --which gave me a count of 397

But select count(*) from ALL_INDEXES where table_owner ='MY_SCHEMA'; -- gave me 357.

What it sounds? Both should be same right?

When checked from Oracle SQL developer by counting the indexes myself, gave me 397

share|improve this question
1  
Are you sure those numbers are correct? They look backwards to me. I would expect ALL_INDEXES to return more than USER_INDEXES. – Jon Heller Jan 24 '14 at 3:53
    
@jonearles : Yes.It is correct. I double-checked that. – e p Jan 24 '14 at 3:58
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is because, the view ALL_INDEXES contains all the indexes the current user has the ability to modify. You will not see the LOB index in this view because LOB indexes cannot be renamed, rebuilt, or modified.

While USER_INDEXES view contains all the indexes that the user owns. The LOB index will be in this view if the user querying it is the same user that created it.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for a new piece of information. So we should go with USER_INDEXES. – e p Jan 24 '14 at 4:09
    
@codeforfood, Yeah. Better to go with USER_INDEXES view to get the all index details including lob types. – Dba Jan 24 '14 at 4:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.