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How can you create a multi-Dimensional array of text? But before that, is such a thing even possible?

I was trying to create a program menu that works with the arrow keys. Here's what I have so far:

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
    char menitem[3][32];
    menitem[1][0] = "Option 1 ";
    menitem[2][0] = "Option 2 ";
    menitem[3][0] = "Option 3 ";
    printf("%s\n%s\n%s", menitem[1], menitem[2], menitem[3]);
}

(I know. It's no done yet.) I keep getting errors like:

[Warning] assignment makes integer from pointer without a cast [enabled by default]

Why is this so? (I'm using DevC++). Thanks in advance!

Extra info:

I use (i): menitem[i][32]

The 32 is the actual size allocation for the text. I would use the [i] as a subscript/index so that I can easily manipulate it instead of having to create multiple conditions.

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char menitem[3][32]; means you defined three character arraies, menitem[0], menitem[1], menitem[2], each could has 32 character in it. –  Lee Duhem Jan 24 '14 at 4:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do it on initialize:

char menuitem[][32]={{"option 1 "},{"option 2 "}, {"option 3 "}};

or

  char menuitem[3][32]; 
  strcpy(menuitem[0],"Option 1");
  strcpy(menuitem[1],"Option 2");
  strcpy(menuitem[2],"Option 3");

another option is to declare menuitem as array of pointers

  char *menuitem[3]; 

  menuitem[0]="Option 1";
  menuitem[1]="Option 2";
  menuitem[2]="Option 3"; 

But in this case the memory is not continuous, and second dimension is not 32, but the length of the string you assigning +1 cell for '\0'

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Awesome! They work now! Thanks! –  Wix Jan 24 '14 at 5:46

It should be like this:

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
    char menitem[3][32];
    menitem[0] = "Option 1 ";
    menitem[1] = "Option 2 ";
    menitem[2] = "Option 3 ";
    printf("%s\n%s\n%s", menitem[0], menitem[1], menitem[2]);
}

Because, in a 2-d array, using 2 indexes will represent a char and that is why you get the error

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Also note the correct zero-based indexing –  Tutti Frutti Jacuzzi Jan 24 '14 at 4:53
    
It gives me this: [Error] incompatible types when assigning to type 'char[32]' from type 'char *' –  Wix Jan 24 '14 at 4:54
    
-1 as it is not possible in c. –  Dabo Jan 24 '14 at 5:16

Just one question!

You have declared Char multi dimensional array as

char menitem[3][32];

And trying to assign as below,

menitem[1][0] = "Option 1 ";
menitem[2][0] = "Option 2 ";
menitem[3][0] = "Option 3 ";

As array dimension is [3] (i.e, [0],[1],[2]) but you are accessing menitem[3]!! Does this work??

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