Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Ruby I could do this.

aaa = "AAA"
bbb = "BBB #{aaa}"

puts(bbb)

> "BBB AAA"

The point of this syntax is eliminating repetition, and making it to feel like a shell script - great for heavy string manipulation.

Does Rust support this? Or have plan to support this? Or have some feature which can mimic this?

share|improve this question
1  
Short answer: no, not that type of interpolation. –  Chris Morgan Jan 24 at 5:28
add comment

1 Answer

Rust has string formatting.

fn main() {
    let a = "AAA";
    let b = format!("BBB {}", a);
    println(b);
}
// output: AAA BBB

In the Rust version, there is no additional repetition but you must explicitly call format!() and the inserted values are separated from the string. This is basically the same way that Python and C# developers are used to doing things, and the rationale is that this technique makes it easier to localize code into other languages.

The Rust mailing list has an archived discussion ([rust-dev] Suggestions) in which the different types of string interpolation are discussed.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems the discussion didn't continue much. Sad. –  Eonil Jan 24 at 5:10
    
A discussion from February 2012 is a long time ago. –  Chris Morgan Jan 24 at 5:27
    
@ChrisMorgan: That's just background information. The background information hasn't changed in the past 23 months, unless you have something you'd like to share. –  Dietrich Epp Jan 24 at 6:26
    
You can also use format!("BBB {name}", name = a). (It would probably actually be possible to use the same parsing & macro infrastructure as format uses to achieve inline_fmt!("BBB {a}"), although hygiene may require some tricks to work around.) –  dbaupp Jan 24 at 11:09
    
@DietrichEpp: in 23 months a lot has changed about the language; things that were considered infeasible or inappropriate then may not be any more. For example, back then printf-formatting was the way things were done while now it is the new style formatting. There is also a much larger community now. These all change the dynamics considerably. –  Chris Morgan Jan 24 at 23:35
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.