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I have an abstract basis class, which I use as a basis for my unit tests (TestNG 5.10). In this class I initialize the whole environment for my tests, setting up database mappings, etc. That abstract class has a method with a @BeforeClass annotation which does the initialization. Next thing, I extend that class with specific classes in which I have @Test methods and also @BeforeClass methods. These methods do class-specific initialization of the environment, e.g. put some records into the database.

My question is how I can enforce a specific order of the @BeforeClass annotated methods. I need the ones from the abstract base class to be executed before the ones of the extending class.

Example:

abstract class A {
 @BeforeClass
 doInitialization() {...}
}

class B extends A {
 @BeforeClass
 doSpecificInitialization() {...}

 @Test
 doTests() {...}
}

Expected order:

A.doInitialization
B.doSpecificInitialization
B.doTests

Actual order:

B.doSpecificInitialization // <- crashes, as the basic init is missing
(A.doInitialization        // <---not executed
 B.doTests)                // <-/
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9 Answers 9

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Don't put the @BeforeClass on the abstract class. Call it from each subclass.

abstract class A {
    void doInitialization() {}
}

class B extends A {
    @BeforeClass
    void doSpecificInitialization() {
        super.doInitialization();
    }

    @Test
    void doTests() {}
}

Seems like TestNG has @BeforeClass(dependsOnMethods={"doInitialization"}) - give it a try.

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2  
That's basically what I wanted to avoid: no need to explicitly call methods of the super (abstract) class. Especially as I also have classes, which inherit from A but don't have an own @BeforeClass method. I'd have to insert one only for that purpose. –  DaDaDom Jan 25 '10 at 14:25
1  
The dependsOnMethods workaround did the trick. Although I'd prefer a "superclass first" approach ... –  DaDaDom Jan 25 '10 at 14:42
1  
To use "dependsOnMethod" shouldn't "doInitialization" be anotated with "@Test"? That is a problem since technically it is not a test by itself... –  N3da Oct 10 '14 at 0:24

edit: Answer below is for JUnit, but I will leave it here anyway, because it could be helpfull.

According to the JUnit api: "The @BeforeClass methods of superclasses will be run before those the current class."

I tested this, and it seems to work for me...

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he's using TestNG, not JUnit –  Bozho Jan 25 '10 at 14:31
    
ah yes, didn't see that... –  Fortega Jan 25 '10 at 14:35
20  
Even though the original question was for TestNG, I arrived here after googling for JUnit and your answer helped - thanks! –  teabot Jan 28 '11 at 12:28

I just tried your example with 5.11 and I get the @BeforeClass of the base class invoked first.

Can you post your testng.xml file? Maybe you are specifying both A and B there, while only B is necessary.

Feel free to follow up on the testng-users mailing-list and we can take a closer look at your problem.

-- Cedric

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No .xml for testng defined (explicitly), it's run from Eclipse and Maven. –  DaDaDom Jan 26 '10 at 8:20
    
How are you running it from Eclipse exactly? Right clicking on class B? –  Cedric Beust Jan 26 '10 at 17:41

How about having your @BeforeClass method call an empty specificBeforeClass() method that may or may not be overwritten by sub classes like so:

public class AbstractTestClass {
  @BeforeClass
  public void generalBeforeClass() {
    // do stuff
    specificBeforeClass();
  }

  protected void specificBeforeClass() {}
}

public class SpecificTest {
  @Override
  protected void specificBeforeClass() {
    // Do specific stuff
  }

  // Tests
}
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When I run from: JUnitCore.runClasses(TestClass.class); It will execute the parent properly, before the child (You do not need super.SetUpBeforeClass();) If you run it from Eclipse: For some reason it fails to run the base class. The work around: Call the base class explicitely: (BaseTest.setUpBeforeClass();) You may want to have a flag in the base class in case you run it from an application, to determine if it is already setup or not. So it only runs once if you run it via both possible methods (such as from eclipse for personal testing, and through ANT for a build release).

This appears to be a bug with Eclipse, or at least unexpected results..

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I added "public" to the abstract class and TestNG (v. 6.0.1) executed the doInitialization() before doTests. TestNG does not execute doInitialization() if I remove "public" from class A.

public abstract class A {
 @BeforeClass
 doInitialization() {...}
}

class B extends A {    
 @Test
 doTests() {...}
}
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I've just gone through this and found one more way to achieve this. Just use alwaysRun on @BeforeClass or @BeforeMethod in the abstract class, works as you would expect.

public class AbstractTestClass {
    @BeforeClass(alwaysRun = true)
    public void generalBeforeClass() {
        // do stuff
        specificBeforeClass();
    }
}
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In my case (JUnit) I have the same methods called setup() in the base class and the derived class. In this case only the derived class's method is called, and I have it call the base class method.

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Why don't you try to create an abstract method doSpecialInit() in your super class, called from your BeforeClass annotated method in superclass.

So developpers inheriting your class is forced to implement this method.

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To be honest, even the logic may have changed within the last 3 1/2 years since I asked this question ... ;-) So yes, maybe this was an idea, maybe it didn't work - I honestly don't remember. –  DaDaDom Sep 5 '13 at 18:22

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