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Can you clarify for me the following: I have

NSMutableArray *_array;

...

_array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:20];

MyClassItem *item;
item = [[MyClassItem alloc] init];

item.a = @"a";
item.b = @"b";
[_array addObject:item];

item.a = @"a1";
item.b = @"b1";
[_array addObject:item];

In this case I receive in _array two similar objects, item[0].a == item[1].a == @"a1" but I thought that item[0].a should be @"a"...

I know that if I will initialize item every time before I add it to array, everything will OK,

MyClassItem *item;
item = [[MyClassItem alloc] init];

item.a = @"a";
item.b = @"b";
[_array addObject:item];

item = [[MyClassItem alloc] init];//If I add this line, everything is OK

item.a = @"a1";
item.b = @"b1";
[_array addObject:item];

but I really can't understand WHY???

I think this way - I have an object, I modify it property and add to the array, after I modify it property one more time and add it to the array, but if it put only pointer to it object, why I fix it with init of same object?

that happens with memory allocated during first init?

Hope you understood my frustrations)

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Pointers, you need to understand pointers. techotopia.com/index.php/… –  sbarow Jan 24 at 9:07
    
I really don't think that this kind of beginner question should be down-voted. We all start somewhere and the question itself is not wrong in any way. It is clear what he asks and even though easy for almost all developers, for some - this may really be a headache. –  avuthless Jan 24 at 9:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have one object, which is referred to by the pointer item. First you assign item.a to be @"a", and then you change its a property to be @"a1". It's the same object both times, though. To create another MyClassItem, you would have to write item = [[MyClassItem alloc] init] again. It's the alloc that creates the object.

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It's clear, tx, but what will happens with memory allocated in first initiation? –  S.ork Jan 24 at 10:31
    
@S.ork: Good question. Well, the object will need to be released before you reassign the variable, or else the object will be leaked and you'll never be able to free the memory. If you're using ARC (which seems to be what most people are doing these days), ARC will automatically put in a release for you. Otherwise, you'll need to do it yourself. –  Chuck Jan 24 at 18:32

In the first case you're changing the same object. The array contains two pointers to the same place in memory. Knowing how pointers work answers your question. In the second example you create a new object (the first one is retained by the array and is not lost) and then you get the correct different properties.

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This is because your item points towards a memory location and whenever you update item, the data on that memory location update and your _array stores memory location of the item instead of their value.

but if you allocate new memory then there are two copies of item on two different memory location thats why when you update the second memory location the first one is not changed.

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To understand this you need to know what is the difference between object and pointer to object.

Object is actual object, with all its data. Pointer is an information where in memory you object exists, and give you access to that object. For more check what means * before variable names in C.

In objc you can only have pointer to objects. So in this case this is what happened.

_array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:20];

MyClassItem *item;
item = [[MyClassItem alloc] init]; //here object is created, pointer to it is stored in 'item'

item.a = @"a"; //you manipulate that object
item.b = @"b";
[_array addObject:item]; //here pointer to it is added to array. Object is not copied, array will contain a pointer pointing at initial item. So item and _array[0] is not two different objects - it's one object.

item.a = @"a1"; //and you are modifying this object
item.b = @"b1";
[_array addObject:item];
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