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I'am trying to program some animations but I am having troubles to understand how the Futures work on Dart.

The main problem is that the animation itself is an asynchronous process and, if I try to chain several points, they pile up and the sprite moves directly to the last point. All the examples I've seen work when the function returns a value but this is not the case when dealing with animations.

I'd like to be able to detect then the animation is finished, in order to trigger the next movement, but I've not been really successful so far.

Here is my code:

class MovingThing {
  String         name;
  DivElement     sprite    = new DivElement();

  MovingThing(this.name){
    sprite.id   = name;
    sprite.text = name;
    sprite.style..width      = "30px"
                ..height     = "30px"
                ..border     = "1px solid black"
                ..position   = "absolute"
                ..transition = "all 2000ms ease-in-out";
    querySelector("body").children.add(sprite);
  }

  Future move(Point p) {
    sprite.style..top  = p.y.toString() + "px"
                ..left = p.x.toString() + "px";

    return Future.wait([sprite.onTransitionEnd.first]);
  }
}

main () {
  List<Point> points = [
    new Point(20, 20)
    , new Point(200, 20)
    , new Point(20, 200)
    , new Point(100, 100)
  ];

  MovingThing mt = new MovingThing("MT");
  Future.forEach(points, (Point p) => mt.move(p));
}
share|improve this question
    
added an example –  Günter Zöchbauer Jan 24 at 11:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I several things

  • Future.wait() does return immediately not when onTransitionEnd is fired.
  • Future.wait is for waiting for more than one Future hence the List parameter. you could use return sprite.onTransitionEnd.first; instead this line.
  • You should add your action to mt.move(p).then((v) => doThisAfterTransitionEnd);
  • I tried your code and onTransitionEnd was not fired.

not perfect but should you show how to start.

new Future() is only used to give the event loop time to do it's work not to chain the animations. The next iteration of the animation starts with the onSubscriptionEnd event.

import 'dart:html';
import 'dart:async';

class MovingThing {
  String         name;
  DivElement     sprite    = new DivElement();
  List<Point>    points;

  MovingThing(this.name){
    sprite.id   = name;
    sprite.text = name;
    sprite.style
      ..top        = "30px"
      ..left       = "30px"
      ..width      = "30px"
      ..height     = "30px"
      ..border     = "1px solid black"
      ..position   = "absolute"
      ..transition = "all 1.5s ease-in-out";

    document.body.children.add(sprite);
  }

  void move(int idx) {

    if(idx >= points.length) {
      return;
    } else {
      var f = sprite.onTransitionEnd.first.then((TransitionEvent e) {
        new Future(() {
        print('transitionEnd$idx');
        move(idx + 1);
        });
      });

      sprite.style
      ..top  = '${points[idx].x}px'
      ..left = '${points[idx].y}px';
      sprite.text = '$idx';

    }
  }
}

main () {
  List<Point> points = [
    new Point(120, 120)
    , new Point(200, 20)
    , new Point(20, 200)
    , new Point(100, 100)
    , new Point(150, 30)
    , new Point(30, 150)
    , new Point(20, 20)
    , new Point(120, 120)
  ];

  MovingThing mt = new MovingThing("MT");
  mt.points = points;
  new Future(() => mt.move(0)); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! Your solution works perfect and I learnt one way to use futures. On the other hand, I'm still trying to understand how could I do to create a method that returns a Future from the onTransitionEnd event. –  Daniel Jan 24 at 15:45
    
This wouldn't make much difference. The then() (after first) is a method called on the future. You could also return sprite.onTransitionEnd.first; and the receiver calls then on the return value he get's from move. This would just change the structure of the code but not the semantics (would probably make the code more complicated for this use case). With new Future() you start a chain of events that go a different (virtual parallel) path then the main program flow. –  Günter Zöchbauer Jan 24 at 16:19

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