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In Git, let's say I've been working on a local branch:

  Common ancestor      
        /\
       A  \
      /    X
     B      \
    /        Y
   C       remote
 local

I made local commits A, B and C and in the mean time the remote branch moved on with commits X and Y. So I do a pull and get:

  Common ancestor      
        /\
       A  \
      /    X
     B      \
    /        Y
   C        /remote
    \      /
     \    /
      \  /
       \/
       M
     local

If I now push, the remote history will include all my A, B, C and M commits... but this isn't what I want.

I want to just push a single commit with the differences from my local branch so the remote branch will just look like this with none of the merging complexity:

  Common ancestor      
         \
          \
           X
            \
             Y
              \
               N
             remote

How can I achieve this?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do a

git pull --rebase

Which is equivalent to git fetch and a git rebase instead of a git merge.

share|improve this answer

Just merge the local changes into the remove ones to get the N commit:

  1. Create, checout a branch remote_n locally, and pull all data from remote's master into the *remote_n* branch:

    git branch remote_n
    git checkout remote_n
    git pull origin master
    
  2. Do a merge of master's HEAD into remote_n, fix inconsisences, and commit changes, so you will get the single N commit (by using --squash option):

    git merge --squash master
    vim ...
    git add .
    git commit
    
  3. Push the result N commit into remote's master branch:

    git push remote master
    

NOTE: You will get the local remote_n branch as a new master branch for your repo.

If you really need to avoid the merge do manually something like:

  1. Get diff of Common, and C commits:

    git diff Common_sha C_sha > common_c.diff
    
  2. Reset tree down to Common commit, pull remote changes, apply the diff, and commit it:

    git reset --hard Common_sha
    git pull remote master
    git apply --ignore-space-change common_c.diff
    git commit
    
  3. Push the result N commit into remote's master branch:

    git push remote master
    

NOTE: this model don't take into account binary files that can't be displayed by git diff.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer but not quite sure this would work... git merge master brings commits A, B and C into the history so wouldn't they be pushed in addition to the N commit? – Steve Chambers Jan 24 '14 at 10:05
    
@SteveChambers so you need to avoid that commits? – Малъ Скрылевъ Jan 24 '14 at 10:06
    
Yes - let's put it another way: I want to make it look as if I've only just pulled the remote branch and made some changes without anyone else changing anything in the mean time - so there's a single line of history. I could obviously do this by pulling the remote into a new local branch and quickly reapplying my changes manually but am wondering if there's a simpler/better way. – Steve Chambers Jan 24 '14 at 10:11
    
@SteveChambers updated – Малъ Скрылевъ Jan 24 '14 at 10:34
    
Thanks for your efforts but unfortunately this gave "error: patch failed" with further messages on individual files such as "patch failed", "patch does not apply" and warnings such as "<blah> has type 100644, expected 100755". – Steve Chambers Jan 24 '14 at 11:45

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