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I have an Ant build that is currently being converted to Maven. However, the Ant build has 2 build targets - one that builds the entire app, and one that builds a JAR from some of those files (only a few). In Ant, it's easy to have multiple build targets to handle this, but I'm trying to determine the best way to handle this in Maven.

I could split the subset of files into a second project and it will have its own POM. Then the first project could depend on this one. However, since the subset of files is so small (less than 10), it seems like it might be overkill to have an entirely new project for that.

Are there other ways to handle this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Your first thought is the correct one. Split the 2 pieces into 2 projects.

The maven philosophy is that each project should build one and only artifact (jar, war, whatever)

You could probably hack something together so that you only have one maven project building 2 atrifacts, but it would be a hack.

You can call ant from maven, so if you really want to do this, then I suggest you start looking at the maven ant plugin. The artifact id is "maven-antrun-plugin"

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You could do this with profiles...

If you really wanted to use two separate profiles and customize the JAR plugin to include and exclude patterns of class and package names, you could easily do this by putting something like this in your POM:

<profiles>
  <profile>
    <id>everything</id>
    <build>
      <plugins>
        <plugin>
          <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
          <configuration>
            <classifier>everything</classifier>
            <includes>
              <include>**/*</include>
            </includes>
          </configuration>
        </plugin>
      </plugins>
    </build>
  </profile>
  <profile>
    <id>only-library</id>
    <build>
      <plugins>
        <plugin>
          <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
          <configuration>
            <classifier>only-library</classifier>
            <excludes>
              <exclude>**/Main*</exclude>
            </excludes>
          </configuration>
        </plugin>
      </plugins>
    </build>
  </profile>
</profiles>

Aside: If that seems like a lot of configuration, polyglot Maven's support for Groovy POMs is just about ready. It will cut the line count down considerably.

You would put this at the end of your pom.xml (withing the project element), and it adds two profiles. The first profile "everything" is really just there to demonstrate the configuration. This "everything" profile is unnecesary because it simply duplicates the behavior of the default JAR plugin jar goal execution. The second profile "only-library" excludes any class in any package that starts with the text "Main". To invoke these profiles:

mvn package -Peverything
mvn package -Ponly-library

I tested this against the sample application that ships with Chapter 6 of Maven by Example, and running either of these commands will produce a JAR file in ${basedir}/target that has a classifier. Since the JAR plugin's jar goal is bound to the package phase in the default maven lifecycle, these two profiles are going to modify the configuration for this plugin.

Or, you could do this with two JAR plugin executions...

If you need to create two JARs without using profiles. You can bind the JAR plugin's jar goal to the package lifecycle phase multiple times and use different configuration for each configured execution. If you configure two separate executions, each execution has an execution-specific configuration block so you can supply a unique identifier and include/exclude pattern for each execution.

Here is the build element you would use to add both custom JARs to the lifecycle phase "package". Doing this on a project with packaging "jar" would result in the jar goal being run three times. Once as the default lifecycle binding, and then twice for two custom, classified JARs.

  <build>
    <plugins>
      <plugin>
        <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
        <executions>
          <execution>
            <id>only-library</id>
            <goals><goal>jar</goal></goals>
            <phase>package</phase>
            <configuration>
              <classifier>only-library</classifier>
              <excludes>
                <exclude>**/Main*</exclude>
              </excludes>
            </configuration>
          </execution>
          <execution>
            <id>everything</id>
            <goals><goal>jar</goal></goals>
            <phase>package</phase>
            <configuration>
              <classifier>everything</classifier>
              <includes>
                <include>**/*</include>
              </includes>
            </configuration>
          </execution>
        </executions>
      </plugin>
    </plugins>
  </build>

If you are not talking about including a different set of classes in each artifact, you'll want to use Maven Assemblies. If you want to know the details of assemblies, there is a chapter listed at the end of this answer from Maven: The Complete Reference. Frankly, i don't think that this particular chapter is a good introductory reference; in fact, I've had numerous reports that this chapter is nearly unreadable (and we're working to fix that). If you are looking to use assemblies, I'd recommend the Maven Assembly Plugin's documentation. In the left-hand nav menu you'll see a list of sample assembly descriptors.

Disclaimer: (Please) don't do this. If you are creating two difference JARs with two different set of classes I strongly recommend that you split the project up into two interdependent modules.

While you can do this with profiles, it is going to be easier for you to split the project into two (actually three). Longer term there are going to be challenges that you are going to face as your application scales. You will be responsible for figuring out this manual list of classes and packages to be included in each of your classified JARs.

There is minimal overhead to having a simple parent project that references two separate modules. If you look at the free Maven by Example book, we show how to make the transition between a single-module and a multi-module project. Chapters 3-5 focus on single module projects, and Chapter 6 shows you how you would combine these single module components into a larger multi-module project.

For more information:

You question involves the following topics, here are some links that will provide more details for each:

The Maven JAR Plugin: http://maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-jar-plugin/jar-mojo.html

Multi-module Maven Projects: Chapter 6 of Maven by Example and Section 3.6.2 of Maven: The Complete Reference.

The Maven Lifecycle (jar is bound to package if your packagin is "jar"): Section 3.5.2 of Maven by Example "Core Concepts" and Chapter 4 of Maven: The Complete Reference

Maven Assemblies: First, the Maven Assembly Plugin site, then Chapter 8 of Maven: The Complete Reference for some heavy (almost too heavy) details.

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3  
Wow, nice answer Tom. Big +1. –  Pascal Thivent Jan 26 '10 at 16:42
    
Thanks for the detailed answer. I'd like to stay away from using package patterns. Seems like a maintenance headache if other devs come in and don't necessarily know the patterns that need to be used. –  Jeff Storey Jan 26 '10 at 20:53

You've got 2 choices:

If the subset is only a collection of resources, then I wouldn't make it a separate module.

If the project is always dependent on the subset which is packaged in a uniform way, then the subset is a good candidate to become a module.

If the subset is repackaged in multiple different "flavours", then I would define assemblies for each "flavour" and qualify the artifact names with a "classifier" see maven coordinates.

Finally, you could use profiles to determine which assemblies get produced, your default profile may only create the initial artifact "flavour" that is required during development.
A "full" profile may produce all "flavour" variants of the artifact for final deployment once development is complete.

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1  
+1 thanks, first time I heard about assemblies –  stacker Jan 25 '10 at 15:05
1  
I've used assemblies for packaging the artifact I built along with dependencies, scripts, etc. Is it common to use the assemblies for building a subset of the files? Or is a better practice to split out the subset of files into its own project? –  Jeff Storey Jan 25 '10 at 15:35

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