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Is there a way to get the count of the currently existing textures, buffers or shaders of a WebGL context? Like the numbers you can get in Firefox if you look at about:memory.

enter image description here

I'd like to check if all these are deleted successfully when my application closes.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is no way to get that info directly from the WebGLRenderingContext but you could easily augment the context yourself something like

var numTextures = 0;
var originalCreateTextureFn = gl.createTexture;
var originalDeleteTextureFn = gl.deleteTexture;
gl.createTexture = function() {
   ++numTextures;
   return originalCreateTextureFn.call(gl);
};
gl.deleteTexture = function(texture) {
   --numTextures;
   originalDeleteTextureFn.call(gl, texture);
};

You can write similar functions for other resources.

Of course if you want to be perfect you'd probably need to add a flag to each object just incase you try to delete something twice and also check the object passed in is actually the right kind. Something like

var numTextures = 0;
var originalCreateTextureFn = gl.createTexture;
var originalDeleteTextureFn = gl.deleteTexture;
gl.createTexture = function() {
   ++numTextures;
   var texture = originalCreateTextureFn.call(gl);
   texture.__deleted__ = false;
};
gl.deleteTexture = function(texture) {
   if (texture && texture instanceof WebGLTexture && !texture.__deleted__) {
     texture.__deleted__ = true;
     --numTextures;
   }
   originalDeleteTextureFn.call(gl, texture);
};
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Is there really no way to communicate with the browser to retrieve this kind of information? I mean, the browser really takes care about this (because it has to), and there is no way to get that data? Sounds not so well. :/ –  Abstract Algorithm Jan 25 '14 at 23:20
    
WebGL is basically just OpenGL ES 2.0 and that has no way either. Seem like a pretty useless feature . U allocate the resources so you can easily track them. Why bloat the API ? –  gman Jan 26 '14 at 10:21
    
Not as API feature itself, but browser integrated. Since browser is doing bunch of things already, and dealing with each JS>webGL call, wouldn't it be more convenient to also track resources allocated? I hope it makes sense what I'm saying. –  Abstract Algorithm Jan 26 '14 at 11:53
1  
I understand what you're saying. It's just my opinion though, there's no reason to add that feature. It would require exposing some public variables or methods. Why have it? OpenGL has not had it and it's now 21 years old. No one has needed it in those 21 years so why add it now even if the browser is tracking that stuff? Especially when you can do it yourself if you need it in just a few lines of code. By the way the browser isn't tracking that stuff directly or at least neither Safari nor Chrome is. At most they know how many the total of all resources are but they don't have counts by type. –  gman Jan 26 '14 at 15:44
    
Okay, thank you for clarification, it does make certain sense. –  Abstract Algorithm Jan 26 '14 at 16:53

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