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I'm working on a project where all the global constants have been defined in a class called Constants, for example

class Constants
{

  const MIN_VALUE = 0.0;
  const MAX_VALUE = 1.0;

  public static function getMinValue()
  {
    return self::MIN_VALUE;
  }

  public static function getMaxValue()
  {
    return self::MAX_VALUE;
  }

  public static function getValueDependingOnURL()
  {
    if($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] == 'something')
    {
      return self::MIN_VALUE;
    }
    else
    {
      return self::MAX_VALUE;
    }
  }
}

Then throughout the code something like Constants::getMaxValue() is used to get the value of a constant. This seems a very strange approach why wouldn't you just use the define function in the outermost scope? I know define() can be quite slow but surely having to call a class property is not the most efficient way either?

EDIT: Also some of the functions have conditions in them hence why functions are called

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closed as primarily opinion-based by vascowhite, Vamsi Krishna B, hakre, legoscia, Bill Woodger Mar 7 '14 at 23:26

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Why have the static methods? Constants::MIN_VALUE will work exactly the same. –  vascowhite Jan 24 '14 at 11:44
    
@vascowhite See edit –  Pattle Jan 24 '14 at 11:46
    
That doesn't make any sense. –  vascowhite Jan 24 '14 at 11:48
    
Why do 2 people close vote this "opinion based" ? There are clear advantages and disadvantages over configuration containers and global defined constants. This has nothing to do with opinion. Seems the question viewers are on the same software design expierence level as OP himself :-) –  DanFromGermany Jan 24 '14 at 11:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Clearify the question: What is the advantage of a configuration container over globally define()ed configuration contstants?

The advantages are all the advantages that OOP offers: Data Abstraction and Encapsulation, Inheritance, Polymorphism and better design pattern integration.

The readers of this thread seem a little confused and focus on your class rather than the main question. To also clearify this, let me give you an example:

class Configuration
{
    protected $someValue;
}

class ConfigurationDev extends Configuration
{
    protected $baseUrl = 'http://devel.yoursite.com/';
}

class ConfigurationLive extends Configuration
{
    protected $baseUrl = 'http://www.yoursite.com/';
}

index.php:

<?php
$config   = new ConfigurationDev;
$tracking = new Tracking($config);
...

class Tracking:

class Tracking
{
    public function __construct(\Configuration $config) {
        if ($config instanceof \ConfigurationLive) {
            // We are in live environment, do track
        } else {
            // Debug Notice: We are NOT in live environment, do NOT track
        }
    }
}

Explanation of the scenario:

Imagine you want to track users, but only on the live system, not on your development system. The Tracking class expects a live configuration but aborts (without impact) if its not the live config.

Your class with const is not the best, because const implies you do not want to change the variables. Do not use the variable for values that may change. You shouldn't use static stuff either because it mostly conflicts with dependency injection. Pass real objects!

Your function public static function getValueDependingOnURL() should be placed in a Helper class, not in a Constant/Configuration container either.

class Helper
{
    protected $config;

    public function __construct(\Configuration $config) {
        $this->config = $config;
        return $this;
    }

    public function getValueByUrl($url) {
        if ($url == 'something') {
            return $config->getMinValue();
        } else {
            return $config->getMaxValue();
        }
    }
}

Now you can have different sets of configuration which the helper class relies on:

$config = new ConfigurationLive;
$helper = new Helper($config);
$value  = $helper->getValueByUrl($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']);

There is a lot of best practice design pattern stuff, code style and OOP in my examples, learn about those and you will gain a much higher level of software engineering than the readers of your question. Good luck!

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1  
Great answer. Thanks! –  Pattle Jan 24 '14 at 14:16

You could do also the short way of getting constants like Constants::MIN_VALUE. Try this yourself.

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Yeah I could. But some of the functions perform conditions so the function needs to be called –  Pattle Jan 24 '14 at 11:45
1  
@Pattle: "Perform conditions"? To return the value of a constant? –  Jon Jan 24 '14 at 11:46
    
Alright I see. But I think declaring a variable global is not good as it breaks the principles of good software engineering. It may also clutter your code if global variables are not stored in one file. –  Justin Paul Paño Jan 24 '14 at 11:49
    
The question is not how to improve the code, the question is what is the advantage of a container class compared to define –  DanFromGermany Jan 24 '14 at 11:50
1  
Then what he did was correct. @Pattle maintained his validations in the methods of the class that greatly promotes code reusability. –  Justin Paul Paño Jan 24 '14 at 11:57

If you're asking about advantages of class constants vs. constants defined in the global scope, I would say that a class constant can be a cleaner approach because of its limited scope. Also it makes sense to have a MAX_VALUE constant defined in a class that uses it, not somewhere else.

But that does not seem to apply in your case, because your Constants class appears to act like a container for some random constants. MIN_VALUE of what?

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