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I find it extremely tiring that I have to update code in two places whenever I'm developing a C++ class. During development, it happens 100+ times (at least for each private method) that I change the declaration of a method, add a const here or there, remove a & reference and so on. I literally hate it that I have to open a second file (the header file) every time I do a little change, and I've seen myself trying to avoid doing private interface changes in the middle of development just because I want to avoid this pain. (You probably think I'm lazy. I am, but it's also a REAL pain that stops me from being as productive as I could be.)

Usually, all of my declarations are in the header, and all of the definitions are in the source. I don't care about inlining or clever little optimization tricks. I love many things about C++, but I'd love it even more if refactoring and developing interfaces was as straightforward as in Java.

Are there any hints for dealing with the situation?

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I have also started to loathe some of stack overflow because no matter what question you type, if it's not a dumb-ass question with an obvious answer that every experienced programmer could find out on his own, but instead a somewhat more general question that is still clearly defined, there is going to be a close request in <5 minutes. –  Hinton Jan 24 '14 at 12:14
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@Hinton If you are able to precisely describe the "new" question, I guess you can produce such statistic yourself: data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/new –  Spook Jan 24 '14 at 12:17
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I literally hate it that I have to open a second file (the header file) every time I do a little change You shouldn't be doing lots of little changes. You should have spent a great deal of time coming up with an interface for your classes, then freezing that interface. It should be quite rare to have to alter it, adding reference types or "adding a const here and there". That's a failing in your design and development process, not in the language. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Jan 24 '14 at 12:41
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When I work on small C++ projects without much prior design, I tend to keep both declaration and definition in the same cpp file, then split a header when ready. Otherwise, yes, you should design interface before. Also remember that this is not Java, so you are not forced to put every function in the class. You can make helpers static and keep them in the definition (cpp) part. –  Stefano Sanfilippo Jan 24 '14 at 12:53
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@LightnessRacesinOrbit "You should have spent a great deal of time coming up with an interface for your classes, then freezing that interface." That depends on the stage of your project (for example what Hinton said above). BDUF is a thing that mostly never works well. You usually freeze your interface after doing lots of little changes. –  BartoszKP Jan 24 '14 at 12:54

1 Answer 1

You could look at LZZ which generates header and source files from single .lzz file. Downside of using it that it not always plays nicely with IDE. For example in my case with Visual Studio + Visual Assist - you could setup syntax highlighting, debug is also working properly and walks in lzz source (but you couldn't walk or set breakpoint in generated .h/.cpp files), but when you looking for declaration you often find it in .h file instead of .lzz. I personally prefer to live without lzz and use IDE for refactoring and quick jumps between declarations and definitions, but some people do not want to wait for c++14 modules and use lzz.

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