Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First off, I am new to COM, and currently quite confused. I've read a lot of documentation on COM on MSDN and the general web, but a lot of it seems outdated and overly complex.

Here's what I believe to be necessary to get it to work. It doesn't yet, so I am sure I am missing something, but by giving my recipe, I hope someone can spot the problem:

  1. Create a C# console app project. I name it CSharpApp
  2. Create a C++ ATL project. I call it ComLib.Interop.
    • Add class (template: ATL Simple Object), which I call "InteropDemo"
    • In class view, right-click IInteropDemo and add a method HelloWorld.
  3. (Removed, kept to keep numbering in answers correct.)
  4. Compile.
  5. Add reference to ComLib.Interop.dll to CSharpApp.
    • Call regsrv32.exe on the compiled COM dll, then select the DLL in the COM tab in 'Add references...'
  6. In Program.cs, Main, create an InteropDemo class and call HelloWorld.
  7. Profit.

Thanks to the answers, I updated the question to reflect the combined solution.

share|improve this question
    
I don't think you need steps 3, 4. Try without them. –  Noseratio Jan 24 at 12:19
    
You could say that COM itself is outdated and overly complex, hence it's not really being developed any more. If you're serious about developing COM servers/objects with C++ then I recommend that you get a book Essential COM by Don Box. Don was the COM guru in the late 90's and early 2000's, before he went to work on the first versions of WCF. Worth its weight in gold. –  simon at rcl Jan 24 at 12:50
    
@Noseratio Doesn't work, I get this error. However, calling tlbimp manually on ComLib.Interop.dll works, and I can add the ComLib.InteropLib.dll that tlbimp generated. But then I run into the original problem with registration again. Updated the question. –  Wilbert Jan 24 at 13:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try following these steps:

  1. Make sure both projects, unmanaged C++ and managed C# have the same bitness, either x86 or x64. Let's say it's x86, for clarity.
  2. Open Admin Command Prompt and register your COM DLL: C:\Windows\SysWOW64\regsvr32.exe c:\full-path\ComLib.Interop.dll
  3. Run Visual Studio as Admin. Do steps 1,2,4,5,6. Don't do 3.

See if you get to 7. I think that should work.

Note you only need the registration on the Development machine. Isolated COM should work everywhere else.

share|improve this answer
    
It worked: I can call the HelloWorld on my dev machine on the registered COM dll. But if I turn on Isolated, it get a build error: Problem isolating COM reference 'ComLibInteropLib': No registered classes were detected for this component. –  Wilbert Jan 24 at 13:31
    
@Wilbert, error or warning? Are you sure both projects are x86, .NET too? You cannot use AnyCPU. –  Noseratio Jan 24 at 13:35
    
Both projects are x64 (I used that since I started with x64, and registered the dll using System32\regsrv32.exe instead of the wow64 one). I can execute my CSharpApp.exe with the registered dll, and it prints out the correct hello world string from the com dll method. –  Wilbert Jan 24 at 13:39
    
At this point, I have no more ideas, but check this. –  Noseratio Jan 24 at 13:41
    
Thanks. I added a follow-up question here –  Wilbert Jan 24 at 14:52

You probably went wrong at step #2, given that you didn't get a build error. The wizard gives you more than one choice for the kind of class you add. The default choice is "C++ class", you need to pick ATL + "ATL Simple Object" instead.

The Class View window now shows two types getting added, the IInteropDemo interface and the CInteropDemo class that implements the interface. You next right-click the interface type (not the class) and use "Add Method". You can now also take a look at the IDL file in the project, it should resemble this:

import "oaidl.idl";
import "ocidl.idl";

[
    object,
    uuid(CBA0D899-2F4C-4F1D-A935-C80CB981C153),
    dual,
    nonextensible,
    pointer_default(unique)
]
interface IInteropDemo : IDispatch{
    [id(1)] HRESULT Method();
};
[
    uuid(ED14ACED-4FF9-4144-B302-CC48C481F28B),
    version(1.0),
]
library ATLProject4Lib
{
    importlib("stdole2.tlb");
    [
        uuid(8543642F-9927-451C-9784-6A7774418299)      
    ]
    coclass InteropDemo
    {
        [default] interface IInteropDemo;
    };
};

That's enough to get it built. Which ought to fail on any modern Windows version, UAC prevents the COM server getting registered. Which requires step #0: Start Visual Studio by right-clicking the shortcut and selecting "Run as Administrator".

share|improve this answer
    
I actually did do that correctly, and generated a class based on ATL Simple Object, and I did add the method to the interface. If I click on one of the IInteropDemo interfaces (the one with hover-text 'struct IInterfaceDemo'), I see the HellowWorld function in the little box below. –  Wilbert Jan 24 at 13:49
    
I also checked the .idl file, the HelloWorld method is added to the interface. –  Wilbert Jan 24 at 13:57
    
Thanks. I added a follow-up question here –  Wilbert Jan 24 at 14:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.