Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I have instantiated the JavaScript object "User". It contains all the necessary for the user management. Even loading and possible AJAX error are managed here. Below there's a snapshot of this object.

var User = function(uid, ajaxURL) {
        this.uid = uid;
        this.ajaxURL = ajaxURL;
     };
     User.prototype = {
        loadingShow: function (tag) {
            this.tag = (tag) ? tag : '.tab-pane';
            $(this.tag + ' .loading').html('<img src="img/template/loading.gif" alt="Loading..." title="Loading...">').fadeIn('fast'); 
            },
            //...
    };
    User.prototype.loadAction = function (rel) {
        var utls = new User();
            var relAttr = rel;
        $.ajax({
            type: 'POST',
            url: this.ajaxURL + '&id=' + parseInt(this.uid),
            cache: true,
            dataType: 'json',
            data: {
                toDo: relAttr
            },
            beforeSend:function(){
                utls.loadingShow('#' + relAttr + '-tab');
            },
            //...

It works fine but i have just a question, perhaps stupid but I'm facing for first times JavaScript OOP and Prototype-Based-programming.

Why must i create var utls = new User(); for call this utls.loadingShow( and not simply call it by this.loadingShow(? Using the this property i obtain the error "TypeError: this.loadingShow is not a function".

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by rlemon, m59, Code Magician, Appleman1234, e-sushi Apr 5 '14 at 18:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Could you post the rest of the loadAction method, specifically the part that comes after the call to $.ajax? –  Tibos Jan 24 '14 at 14:47
    
I edited the post as you required :) Thx –  Roberto Rizzi Jan 24 '14 at 14:50
    
You don't have to create a new one, you just need to understand scope. Inside the ajax functions thisArg is no longer pointing to the User object, but likely window or the jQuery ajax or something else. you can use Function.bind or store the thisArg outside of the ajax function scope. or I suppose according to Cooke Monster's answer there is a context property you can use :P –  rlemon Jan 24 '14 at 14:53
1  
var utls = this;. –  Karl-André Gagnon Jan 24 '14 at 14:56
1  
@RobertoRizzi the more correct answer since you are using jQuery.ajax would probably to use the 'context' property when creating the call. –  rlemon Jan 24 '14 at 15:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"Why must i create var utls = new User(); for call this utls.loadingShow( and not simply call it by this.loadingShow(?"

Because this in the callback is set to the jqXHR object.

To override it, you can set the context: property of the $.ajax request to the this value that you want.

$.ajax({
        type: 'POST',
        url: this.ajaxURL + '&id=' + parseInt(this.uid),
        cache: true,
        dataType: 'json',
        context: this, // <-- set the `this` value of the callbacks
        data: {
            toDo: relAttr
        },
        beforeSend:function(){
        //   v--- now it's correct
            this.loadingShow('#' + relAttr + '-tab');
        },
        success: function(data) {
            var art_tmp_str = '';

 // Why are you using this? ---v
 //           $(document).ajaxComplete(function(event, request, settings) {

             //   v--- now it's correct
                this.loadingHide('#' + relAttr + '-tab');
                $('#' + relAttr + '-tab').html(''); 
                if(data.success === true) {
                               //   v--- now it's correct
                    art_tmp_str = this.writeAction(relAttr, data);
                    $('#' + relAttr + '-tab').append(art_tmp_str);
                } else
                    $('#' + relAttr + '-tab').append('<p>' + data.error + '</p>');
//            });

Furthermore, there shouldn't be any need to give a handler to .ajaxComplete() when you're already in a success callback. This should be done before any ajax requests are made if you really want a single behavior applied to all completed requests.

share|improve this answer
    
I couldn't ask anything better! Thank you very much!! :) –  Roberto Rizzi Jan 24 '14 at 15:12
    
You're welcome. –  cookie monster Jan 24 '14 at 15:12

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.