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EDITED It seems that when using distributed transactions (EnterpriseServicesInteropOption.Full) and durable subscribers, the TransactionScope.Dispose method does not wait for all the commits to have completed, but just spawns the method calls and the TransactionCompleted event to background threads.

This is not conform the documentation that clearly states:

This method is synchronous and blocks until the transaction has been committed or aborted.

What's worse is that there seems to be no way way to determine when all commits have been processed. This is problematic because in console applications, the main thread can quit after the dispose and this effectively kills all background threads. Remote participants in the distributed transaction will never be notified of this, resulting in locks that remain open, timeouts and other ugly things...

Another issue with this is that when a new TransactionScope is created, participants can still be associated with the old transaction when they are expected to be registered within the new one.

The (simplified) code below demonstrates this problem.

My question: does anybody have an idea how to determine whether it is safe to start a new loop or not (yet)? I don't have access to the Worker's code, so I can't change anything in there... Adding a Thread.Sleep(1000) solves the problem, but that kills the performance...

EDITED

internal class TransactionScopeTest
{
    [STAThread]
    public static void Main()
    {
        var transactionOptions = new TransactionOptions { Timeout = TransactionManager.DefaultTimeout };
        var worker = new Worker();
        var transactionCompletedEvent = new AutoResetEvent(true); // true to start a first loop

        while (true)
        {
            transactionCompletedEvent.WaitOne(); // wait for previous transaction to finish

            Log("Before TransactionScope");
            using (var tx = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, transactionOptions, EnterpriseServicesInteropOption.Full))
            {
                Log("Inside TransactionScope");
                Transaction.Current.TransactionCompleted += delegate
                {
                    transactionCompletedEvent.Set(); // allow a next loop to start
                    Log("TransactionCompleted event");
                };
                worker.DoWork();
                Log("Before commit");
                tx.Complete();
                Log("Before dispose");
            }
            Log("After dispose");
        }
    }

    private static void Log(string message)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} ({1})", message, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    }


    public class Worker : IEnlistmentNotification
    {
        private Transaction _transaction;
        private readonly Guid _id = Guid.NewGuid();

        public void Prepare(PreparingEnlistment preparingEnlistment)
        {
            Log("Preparing");
            preparingEnlistment.Prepared();
        }

        public void Commit(Enlistment enlistment)
        {
            Log("Committing");
            _transaction = null;
            enlistment.Done();
        }

        public void Rollback(Enlistment enlistment)
        {
            Log("Rolling back");
            _transaction = null;
            enlistment.Done();
        }

        public void InDoubt(Enlistment enlistment)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId + "Doubting");
            _transaction = null;
            enlistment.Done();
        }

        public void DoWork()
        {
            Enlist();
            Log("Doing my thing...");
        }

        private void Enlist()
        {
            if (_transaction == null) //Not yet enlisted
            {
                Log("Enlisting in transaction");
                _transaction = Transaction.Current;
                _transaction.EnlistDurable(_id,this, EnlistmentOptions.EnlistDuringPrepareRequired);
                return;
            }
            if (_transaction == Transaction.Current) //Already enlisted in current transaction
            {
                return;
            }
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Already enlisted in other transaction");
        }
    }
}

Output:

Before commit (1)
Before dispose (1)
Preparing (6)
After dispose (1)
Committing (6)
TransactionCompleted event (7)
Before TransactionScope (1)
Inside TransactionScope (1)
Enlisting in transaction (1)
Doing my thing... (1)
Before commit (1)
Before dispose (1)
Preparing (7)
After dispose (1)
Before TransactionScope (1)
TransactionCompleted event (7)
Inside TransactionScope (1)
Committing (6)

Unhandled Exception: System.InvalidOperationException: Already enlisted in other transaction
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Transaction.Current.TransactionCompleted is always executed after worker.Commit notification. Add an AutoResetEvent to track TransactionCompleted and wait for it before staring a new loop:

var transactionCompletedEvent = new AutoResetEvent(true); // true to start a first loop

while (true)
{
    transactionCompletedEvent.WaitOne(); // wait for previous transaction to finish

    Log("Before TransactionScope");
    using (var tx = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, transactionOptions, EnterpriseServicesInteropOption.Full))
    {
        Log("Inside TransactionScope");
        Transaction.Current.TransactionCompleted += delegate 
        {
            transactionCompletedEvent.Set(); // allow a next loop to start
            Log("TransactionCompleted event"); 
        };
        worker.DoWork();
        Log("Before commit");
        tx.Complete();
        Log("Before dispose");
    }
    Log("After dispose");
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are correct. That did solve the problem with the sample, but your solution didn't help in my problematic program where the 'worker' is an IBM Websphere MQ object. So I investigated this a bit further and the only difference I can find is that the MQ registers itself as durable. That seems to influence the behavior of the TransactionScope as the 'TransactionCompleted' event now seems to be raised on a different thread than the Commits and is sometimes received before the commit is actually called. I altered the sample in my first post to demonstrate this. –  Marc Selis Jan 25 at 20:56
    
You should use different MQ object for different transactions. Durable enlistment means that commit notification may not arrive for minutes or hours. See MSDN (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229975(v=vs.110).aspx) for details: ...during this period, the resource manager is in doubt about the outcome of the transaction. It does not know whether the transaction committed or aborted. While the resource manager is in doubt about a transaction, it keeps the data modified by keeping the transaction locked, thereby isolating these changes from any other transactions. –  PashaPash Jan 27 at 11:26
    
Ok, I can agree to that. Recreating an MQ connection in each transaction is a huge performance hit, but if that improves stability I'm willing to accept that. –  Marc Selis Jan 27 at 16:02
    
However, one problem still remains. The problematic program I'm talking about is scheduled to run every 15 minutes. It should process all messages in a certain queue and then stop. The problem still remains that if the main thread stops, all queued commit calls are also stopped. What's worse is that some of the commits may even not have been called yet. You can see that in the sample output above: the last commit is called while running in the loop again. As far as I know there is no way to check whether they are called or not. –  Marc Selis Jan 27 at 16:05

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