Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing some Objective-C code and I've frequently hit the situation where I have to use a class variable to store a value for one time use. After consuming it I no longer need it. To me, storing this value in a class variable seems like code smell. Really the value should be passed in as a parameter to the methods I'm using.

I run across this usually when I'm consuming delegates. As an example, I have a UI with multiple buttons used to load and display a UIActionSheet when they're tapped. This action sheet contains a date picker which sets a value for a UILabel when the action sheet is dismissed.

- (IBAction)setPurchaseDateTapped {
    self.activeField = purchaseDate;
    [self loadDatePickerActionSheet:@"Edit Purchase Date"];
}

- (void)actionSheet:(UIActionSheet *)actionSheet clickedButtonAtIndex:(NSInteger)buttonIndex {
    self.activeField.text = value_from_UIActionSheet;
}

As you can see here, the actionSheet clickedButtonAtIndex callback doesn't allow me to pass the activeField so I have to use a class variable. It seems more correct to write this:

- (void)actionSheet:(UIActionSheet *)actionSheet parameterValue:(id)parameter {
    parameter.text = value_from_UIActionSheet;
}

I believe(?) that I can subclass the UIActionSheet and UIActionSheet delegate and add the signatures that I require, but again this seems like more effort than it's worth.

So my question is what is the best way to do what I'm trying to do?

I don't necessarily want to change the date picker/action sheet interface that I've created (although if there's a better pattern for setting multiple dates on a UIView while keeping the DatePicker out of the way, I'm all ears.)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In this case, I think a simple subclass of UIActionSheet would be the way to go:

@interface SpecialActionSheet : UIActionSheet
{
    id parameter;
}
@property (assign) id parameter;
@end

@implementation SpecialActionSheet
@synthesize parameter;
@end

That should be enough, since all you want to do is have the actionSheet keep a parameter. Now, your code might look as follows:

- (void)loadDatePickerActionSheet:(NSString *)caption forField:(UITextField *)field {
    //...
    datePickerActionSheet.parameter = field;
}

- (IBAction)setPurchaseDateTapped {
    [self loadDatePickerActionSheet:@"Edit Purchase Date" forField:purchaseDate];
}

- (void)actionSheet:(UIActionSheet *)actionSheet clickedButtonAtIndex:(NSInteger)buttonIndex {
    UITextField * field = ((SpecialActionSheet *)actionSheet).parameter;
    field.text = value_from_UIActionSheet;
}
share|improve this answer

My usual approach in these situations is to use the tag property on UIAlertViews, and do a switch on it (it's an integer). It's not quite as nice as having a string or something to pass down, but if you've got multiple alerts, it's an easy way to disambiguate. For example:

...
actionSheet.tag = [fields indexOfObject: self.activeField];
...        //fields is an NSArray of all the field objects I might have on the screen


- (void)actionSheet:(UIActionSheet *)actionSheet parameterValue:(id)parameter {
    [[field objectAtIndex: actionSheet.tag] setText: value_from_UIActionSheet];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't aware of the tags property. I'll have to look into this. –  Gavin Miller Jan 25 '10 at 17:38

Another solution is to use associative storage.

UIActionSheet might already have it. You can test it by

[myActionSheet setValue:@"test value" forKey:@"testKey];
NSLog(@"%@",[myActionSheet valueForKey:@"testKey];

Associative storage is rather nifty if not overused.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.