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def countMe(num):
    for i in range(0, num, 3):
        print (i)

countMe(18)

def oddsOut(num1, num2):

    for i in range(num1):
        for j in range(num2):
            print(i*j)

oddsOut(3, 8)

I don't understand how the range function works:

  • in countMe shouldn't the code go up till 18 ;
  • why is the last number printed in countMe 15, and not 18 ;
  • why is that in the second function oddsOut the function only founts till 7 for j and not 8 even though j is 8 ;
  • why is the last number printed in oddsOut 14.
share|improve this question
8  
The stop parameter (the second one) of range is exclusive not inclusive. – Hyperboreus Jan 24 '14 at 20:03
3  
Almost all ranges things in Python are "half-open", meaning that the start is inclusive and the stop is exclusive—the range function, slices, etc. This is explained in the tutorial chapter on Strings, the first place slices are introduced, and should show up similarly early in any other tutorials/texts/etc. – abarnert Jan 24 '14 at 20:08
    
If you want it to include 18, maybe just change num to num + 3 – user3193087 Jan 24 '14 at 20:09
    
The only thing in the stdlibs I know, where the end point is included is random.randint. – Hyperboreus Jan 24 '14 at 20:11
    
@user3193087 actually, no. You need to change num to num+1. – zmo Jan 24 '14 at 20:13
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The stop parameter in a range does not include that number for example

for i in range(0,5):
    print i

would print 0-4 but not 5.

share|improve this answer

well, from the help:

>>> help(range)
range(...)
    range([start,] stop[, step]) -> list of integers

    Return a list containing an arithmetic progression of integers.
    range(i, j) returns [i, i+1, i+2, ..., j-1]; start (!) defaults to 0.
    When step is given, it specifies the increment (or decrement).
    For example, range(4) returns [0, 1, 2, 3].  The end point is omitted!
    These are exactly the valid indices for a list of 4 elements.

so the last increment is not stop, but the last step before stop.

  • in countMe shouldn't the code go up till 18 ;
  • why is the last number printed in countMe 15, and not 18 ;
  • why is that in the second function oddsOut the function only founts till 7 for j and not 8 even though j is 8 ;
  • why is the last number printed in oddsOut 14.

more generally speaking the answer to those questions is that in most of the languages, a range is defined as [start:stop[, i.e. the last value of the range is never included, and the indexes start always at 0. The mess being that in a few languages and when working on algorithmics, ranges start at 1 and are inclusive with the last value.

In the end, if you want to include the last value you can do:

def closed_range(start, stop, step=1):
    return range(start, stop+1, step)

or in your example:

>>> def countMe(num):
>>>     for i in range(0, num+1, 3):
>>>         print (i)
>>> 
>>> countMe(18)
0
3
6
9
12
15
18
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
stop-step? So the last number yielded by range (0, 100, 7) would be 93? (it is 98 actually) – Hyperboreus Jan 24 '14 at 20:06
    
oops, correcting this :-) never happened! :-p – zmo Jan 24 '14 at 20:07

Ranges in Python do not include the ending value. This is consistent with slices.

If you need a way to remember this, consider that range(10) has 10 elements - the numbers 0 through 9.

share|improve this answer

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