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My .bashrc file contains:

# mkdir, cd into it
function mkcd () 
{
    mkdir -p "$*"
    cd "$*"
}

When I type mkcd in shell I get mkcd: Command not found. when I type source ~/.bashrc I get an error:

Badly placed ()'s.

by the way, my text editor (emacs) is recognising the code as Shell-script[tcsh].

How do I fix this?

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What do you mean "not working"? Did you run source ~/.bashrc after editing it? –  admdrew Jan 24 '14 at 20:27
    
Wrong shell. Badly placed ()'s is a message produced by tcsh. Switch to bash or ksh. –  Henk Langeveld Jan 25 '14 at 15:05
    
@HenkLangeveld thank you, that solved it. I was shamefully unaware that bash and default ubuntu terminal were different. –  Alexandre Holden Daly Jan 25 '14 at 21:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you can accept the restriction that you have to pass the name of the directory to be created as the first argument, it should look like this:

# mkdir, cd into it
function mkcd () 
{
    mkdir -p "$@"
    cd "$1"
}

You need to run source ~/.bashrc to see it working (or alternatively start a new shell).

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when I do that I get Badly placed ()'s. when I drop the () I get function: Command not found. {: Command not found. Illegal variable name. –  Alexandre Holden Daly Jan 25 '14 at 12:09
    
The code should work. Are you sure you are using bash? –  hek2mgl Jan 25 '14 at 12:36
    
thank you, that solved it. I was shamefully unaware that bash and default ubuntu terminal were different. –  Alexandre Holden Daly Jan 25 '14 at 21:27
    
yeah, ubuntu is using dash by default :) –  hek2mgl Jan 25 '14 at 22:41
    
really? but I had to type bash in order to enter the bash environment on the ubuntu terminal –  Alexandre Holden Daly Jan 26 '14 at 0:24

Three comments on that function. This will work mostly. To catch some corner cases:

  1. Either use function mkcd { ...; } or mkcd() { ...; }. The first is compatible with ksh, but only if you drop the (). The mkcd() notation is the standard POSIX notation.

  2. Even mkdir -p can fail, so make the cd conditional on mkdir.

  3. Finally, you want exactly one argument to mkdir and cd. Use only one argument, and test that it has a value with the :? modifier in parameter substitution. This will stop the function from sending you $HOME.

Together:

function mkcd
{
    mkdir -p "${1:?}" && cd "${1}"
}

Put that in your .bashrc and open a new shell. Type type mkcd. This should respond with:

mkcd is a function, followed by its definition.

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when I drop (), add ; and type source ~.bashrc, I get function: Command not found. {: Command not found. Bad : modifier in $ (?). –  Alexandre Holden Daly Jan 25 '14 at 11:59
    
when I paste the code you suggested in /.bashrc, open new shell and type type mkcd I get cat: mkcd: No such file or directory. when I type source ~/.bashrc I get function: Command not found. {: Command not found. Bad : modifier in $ (?). –  Alexandre Holden Daly Jan 25 '14 at 12:03

I ran your mkcd function on bash 4.2.45 and linux 3.8.0 and it worked as expected. Logging on in a fresh window or running

source ~/.bashrc 

in your existing window should define the function for you. If it does not work you'll get an error message like:

mkcd: command not found

While hek2mgl's suggestion is not necessary to make it work, it does make it make more sense since you're only going to cd to one directory.

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actually I got function: Command not found. {: Command not found. Bad : modifier in $ (?). as an error message. what do you think that means? –  Alexandre Holden Daly Jan 25 '14 at 12:05

As commented by Henk Langeveld and hek2mgl: "Wrong shell. Badly placed ()'s is a message produced by tcsh. Switch to bash or ksh."

I thought that opening a terminal on ubuntu entered straight into bash environment. In fact, as commented below, "a Terminal will start a copy of your login shell as defined in /etc/passwd". By typing ps -p $$ in terminal, I realise mine is set to tcsh, the C shell. In that case, one needs to type bash to get into bash environment.

Then source ~/.bashrc compiles the definition for mkcd.

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A Terminal will start a copy of your login shell as defined in /etc/passwd. This can be overruled by the $SHELL environment variable at the time of invocation, or in the Terminal session definitions for setting a command in place of our shell. –  Henk Langeveld Jan 26 '14 at 15:01

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