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I have a simple app that shows rows of data in Angular. When the controller is initially loaded with data, I want the rows to appear in the same order they were added to my rows array. So, the orderBy property will initially be set to an empty string. Clicking on the column header should then set the orderBy property to the appropriate value.

Here's my fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/fLjMR/3/.

Here's my JS:

function ctrl($scope)
{
    var rows = [];
    for(var i = 10;i < 30;i++)
    {
        rows.push({name: "Fake Name " + i, email: "fakeemail" + i + "@gmail.com"});
    }

    $scope.rows = rows;
    $scope.orderBy = "";
};

Here's my HTML:

<table ng-app ng-controller="ctrl">
    <thead>
        <th><a ng-click="orderBy='name'">Name</a></th>
        <th><a ng-click="orderBy='email'">Email</a></th>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr ng-repeat="row in rows | orderBy:[orderBy]">
            <td>{{row.name}}</td>
            <td>{{row.email}}</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

When I do this in IE and FF, the rows intially appear in the order they were added, but when I do it in Chrome, the middle item (in this case row #20) appears at the beginning of the list. Why is this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you only have one property that you order by then you can pass just the string to the filter rather than an array:

<tr ng-repeat="row in rows | orderBy:orderBy">
share|improve this answer
    
Huh. Well what do you know, that fixed it. I was aware you could get rid of the brackets, but I was planning on adding some additional parameters later on. Why would the brackets make a difference? –  wldrumstcs Jan 24 at 22:27
1  
Just took a peek at the angular source. The orderByFilter short circuits if the sort predicate (the thing after the colon) is a falsy value and returns the array unsorted. An empty string is a falsy value. An array containing an empty string is not a falsy value so a sort is attempted using that empty string as a predicate. –  Gruff Bunny Jan 24 at 22:45
    
Great stuff. I think you nailed it! Thanks a lot! –  wldrumstcs Jan 24 at 23:08

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