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This was given to me in a recent programming interview. I am given an unsorted array of integers with negative and positive values, and required to sort them but only for the positive values. I was wondering what some of your solutions might be without using Google.

After getting home I found Arrays.sort() sorts the array in ascending order but I am not sure how to output to new array with only the positive values, as this was a requirement. I am able to print them by just printing if they are greater than -1, but how would I input them into new array without having to loop through the array and count the number of positive values to get the size of the new array, instantiate new array, then loop again to add them to new array.. This solution seems not optimal, is there a better way ?

the output needs to be a new array with only positive values, that is sorted

Below is what I have so far:

  import java.util.Arrays;


    public class Test {

        public static void main(String[] args) {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub      
            int[] unsorted = {
                -3, 95, -4, 20, 5, 6, 8
            };
            int[] sorted = unsorted;
            Arrays.sort(sorted);

            for (int s: sorted) {
                if (s > -1)
                    System.out.println(s);
            }
        }

    }
share|improve this question
3  
What you are saying sounds like filtering + sorting. "output to new array with only the positive values". Do you want a new array with only positive values, that is sorted. Or did you mean you want a new array that has both negative and positive values, but only the positive values are sorted. – crush Jan 24 '14 at 22:41
1  
The problem is underspecified. What does "sort them but only for the positive values" mean? – Jim Garrison Jan 24 '14 at 22:41
    
It sounds to me like the intent of this interview question is to check to see if you really understand the process of sorting. This is relevant in an interview because writing custom sort logic is something that happens fairly often in many programming positions. – crush Jan 24 '14 at 22:42
    
I want Do you want a new array with only positive values, that is sorted – Eduardo Dennis Jan 24 '14 at 22:43
1  
If given the choice of languages I would use C# and say unsorted.Where(i => i > 0).OrderBy(i => i).ToArray() – chuckj Jan 24 '14 at 22:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could try putting the data in a PriorityQueue, making sure to only deal with the positive values:

int[] unsorted = { -3, 95, -4, 20, 5, 6, 8 };

PriorityQueue<Integer> q = new PriorityQueue<>(unsorted.length);

for (int a : unsorted) {
    if (a > 0)
        q.add(a);
}

while (!q.isEmpty()) {
    System.out.println(q.poll());
}
5
6
8
20
95

This approach will be O(nlog(n)) where n is the number of positive integers in the array. Sorting the entire array, by contrast, will be O(nlog(n)) where n is the length of the entire array.

share|improve this answer
    
Where are you getting O(nlog(n))? The Javadoc for Priority Queue says Implementation note: this implementation provides O(log(n)) time for the enqueing and dequeing methods. – Rainbolt Jan 24 '14 at 23:07
2  
You repeat the O(log(n)) of the priority queue n times giving O(n log(n)). This is just a disguised heap sort. – chuckj Jan 24 '14 at 23:11
    
@chuckj Yes, that's absolutely right. – arshajii Jan 24 '14 at 23:18

What if you performed a binary search for 0 on your sorted array, and then only printed values from that point on? Arrays.binarySearch() returns the index that 0 WOULD be at if it doesn't find 0 in your array.

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {    
        int[] unsorted = {
            -3, 95, -4, 20, 5, 6, 8
        };
        int[] sorted = unsorted;
        Arrays.sort(sorted);

        int breakingPoint = Arrays.binarySearch(sorted, 0);
        for (int i = breakingPoint; i < sorted.length; i++) {
            System.out.println(sorted[i]);
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
This has problem of n being the size of the original array instead of n being the number of positive integers for the O(n log n) of the sort. Not a big deal for small number of negative numbers but a big deal for large arrays. – chuckj Jan 24 '14 at 23:03
    
Now that I think about it, you're right. It would be more efficient to reduce n for sorting, which is O(nlog(n)) and let it be large for checking-for-positives, which is O(n). I'll leave this answer, though, since you provided some valuable insight. – Rainbolt Jan 24 '14 at 23:15

You should make your own sorting algorithm. I would use a modified quicksort in an interview:

1-pick 0 to be the pivot for the first recursive call and put all numbers that are equal or bigger than 0 on the right array

2-Only call quicksort on the right array for the first recursive call,for the other recursive calls,use a random pivot.

3- When concatenating,remove the first 0 you find.

Fast(nlogN),and you can do it even in the same array,or return a new one.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually you don't need step (3) as the first step already tells you where to stop. This also sounds like the answer the interviewer was going for. – chuckj Jan 24 '14 at 23:09
    
mmm,yup,he can keep concatenating as long as the pivot is not 0. – Roudy Tarabay Jan 24 '14 at 23:15

In Java, the Collection.sort must be stable, so if you have use a comparator that says that all negative numbers are equal, but for positive numbers does what you'd expect, you'd have what you need.

share|improve this answer

Creating a list just for the dynamic aspect would mean potentially resizing the array multiple times during the removal process.

I elected instead to use Arrays.copyOf to resize the array after I knew how big it needed to be.

The first thing I did was filter out the negatives:

int[] unsorted = {
    -3, 95, -4, 20, 5, 6, 8
};

int[] positives = new int[unsorted.length]; //It can only be as big as unsorted.

int i = 0, j = 0;

for (; i < unsorted.length; i++) {
    if (unsorted[i] >= 0)
        positives[j++] = unsorted[i];
}

Then, I resize the array:

positives = Arrays.copyOf(positives, j);

Finally, I sort it:

Arrays.sort(positives);

Here is an IDEOne.com demo

share|improve this answer
    
Please leave a comment on your decision to down-vote this answer. – crush Aug 19 '15 at 13:43

simple separate the positive numbers - it needs one copy

List<Integer> positives = new ArrayList<Integer>();
for (Integer number: unsorted) {
    if (number > 0) {
        positives.add(number);
    }
}

and then sort them.

Collections.sort(positives);
share|improve this answer
  1. Iterate the array
  2. For each positive value, store the position and value into two arrays
  3. Sort the value array
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you need step (4)? Isn't the value array the array you want? – chuckj Jan 24 '14 at 23:04
    
Because negative ones are also important :-) why are they stated? – Leo Jan 24 '14 at 23:24
    
In the revised question Edwardo makes it clear they are not. – chuckj Jan 25 '14 at 3:31
    
answer fixed. although, the priority queue was really the best answer – Leo Jan 25 '14 at 15:45

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