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Is there a "pythonic" way of getting only certain values from a list, similar to this perl code:

my ($one,$four,$ten) = line.split(/,/)[1,4,10]
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7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I think you are looking for operator.itemgetter:

import operator
line=','.join(map(str,range(11)))
print(line)
# 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
alist=line.split(',')
print(alist)
# ['0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10']
one,four,ten=operator.itemgetter(1,4,10)(alist)
print(one,four,ten)
# ('1', '4', '10')
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1  
This is a lot of code ... –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 25 '10 at 18:32
5  
Not really. If you take out the demonstrative code it can look like this: one,four,ten=operator.itemgetter(1,4,10)(line.split(',')) –  Eric Palakovich Carr Jan 25 '10 at 18:36
    
You’re a lifesaver, thanks! If timeit is right, this should reduce the runtime of a codesnippet we examined today from 9 hours to a few seconds. –  Arne Babenhauserheide Apr 16 '12 at 16:20

Using a list comprehension

line = '0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10'
lst = line.split(',')
one, four, ten = [lst[i] for i in [1,4,10]]
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1  
It is called a list comprehension, not list compression. –  Bengt Dec 1 '12 at 23:02
    
Corrected. live long. –  has2k1 Dec 8 '12 at 18:32
lst = line.split(',')
one, four, ten = lst[1], lst[4], lst[10]
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2  
I think you misunderstood the question –  Idan K Jan 25 '10 at 18:27
    
@Idan: may be I have, am I not supposed to get 2nd, 5th and 11th elements of the new list? –  SilentGhost Jan 25 '10 at 18:30
1  
@Idan K: There's no requirement that the "Pythonic" version be a single expression like the Perl version. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 25 '10 at 18:31
4  
The idea that less lines of code == better code is incorrect –  Lennart Regebro Jan 25 '10 at 18:32
    
Why the downvote? –  SilentGhost Jan 25 '10 at 21:17

Try operator.itemgetter (available in python 2.4 or newer):

Return a callable object that fetches item from its operand using the operand’s _getitem_() method. If multiple items are specified, returns a tuple of lookup values.

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> line = ','.join(map(str, range(11)))
>>> line
'0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10'
>>> a, b, c = itemgetter(1, 4, 10)(line.split(','))
>>> a, b, c
('1', '4', '10')

Condensed:

>>> # my ($one,$four,$ten) = line.split(/,/)[1,4,10]
>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> (one, four, ten) = itemgetter(1, 4, 10)(line.split(','))
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The right import is from operator import itemgetter –  Roberto Bonvallet Jan 25 '10 at 21:42
    
thx, edited ... –  miku Jan 26 '10 at 1:29
    
You’re a lifesaver, thanks! If timeit is right, this should reduce the runtime of a codesnippet we examined today from 9 hours to a few seconds. –  Arne Babenhauserheide Apr 16 '12 at 16:21

How about this:

index = [1, 0, 0, 1, 0]
x = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
[i for j, i in enumerate(x) if index[j] == 1]
#[1, 4]
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Yes:

data = line.split(',')
one, four, ten = data[1], data[4], data[10]

You can also use itemgetter, but I prefer the code above, it's clearer, and clarity == good code.

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Alternatively, if you had a Numpy array instead of a list, you could do womething like:

from numpy import array

# Assuming line = "0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10"
line_array = array(line.split(","))

one, four, ten = line_array[[1,4,10]]

The trick here is that you can pass a list (or a Numpy array) as array indices.

EDIT : I first thought it would also work with tuples, but it's a bit more complicated. I suggest to stick with lists or arrays.

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