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Thanks in advance for any help!

I'm currently working my way through "Jumping into C++" by Alex Allain and so far its a great book as far as a crash course in C++. At least for me it is. Anywho I'm on chapter 14 which discusses using pointers for 2D arrays and one of the practice problems challenges the reader to create a 3D multiplication table array with arbitrary length, width, and height as chosen by the user at runtime. I think I've got the code up and working and thanks to someone on here I was able to get rid of all my compile errors associated with creating a 3D array using pointers.

I would post a picture of my problem but of course my reputation isn't high enough. Basically after I compile and run the program I enter 3 separate dimensions for height, width, and depth of the 3D array and then I get the exciting message of "Segmentation fault (core dumped). I have some debugging cout messages in my code but none of them show up which confuses me. I don't understand why my code would crash before the first debug message at the earliest. The only time it makes it anywhere is if I enter 1 for all three values. But then only the debugging messages show up and nothing actually prints like I think it should.

And here is my code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void printMultTable(int*** p_cube, int height, int width, int depth);

int main() {
    int height = 0;
    int width = 0;
    int depth = 0;

    // Get user input for height, witdth, and depth of multiplication cube
    cout << "Enter height:  ";
    cin >> height;

    cout << "Enter width:  ";
    cin >> width;

    cout << "Enter depth:  ";
    cin >> depth;

    cout << "Made it to point A";

    // Create pointer to pointer for multiplication tables
    int ***p_cube = new int**[depth]; // Creates pointer to 2D pointer array (Layers of Cube)

    cout << "Made it to point B";

    for (int i = 0; i < height; i ++) {
        p_cube[i] = new int*[height]; // Creates pointer to 1D array (Columns of Cube)
        for (int j = 0; i < width; i++) {
            p_cube[i][j] = new int[width]; // Creats pointers that are arrays (Rows of Cube)
        }
    }

    cout << "Made it to point C";


    // Create multiplication table
    for (int i = 0; i < depth; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < height; j++) {
            for (int k = 0; k < width; k++) {
                p_cube[i][j][k] = (j+1) * (k+1);
            }
        }
    }

    cout << "Made it to point D";

    // Use printMultTable to print out multiplication table
    printMultTable(p_cube, height, width, depth);

    // Deallocate memory taken by pointers
    for (int i = 0; i < height; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < width; j++){
            delete[] p_cube[i][j];
        }
        delete p_cube[i];
    }
    delete[] p_cube;
}

void printMultTable(int*** p_cube, int height,int width,int depth) {
    for (int i = 0; i < depth; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < height; j++) {
            for (int k = 0; k < width; k++) {
                cout << p_cube[i][j][k] << "\t";
            }
            cout << "\n";
        }
        cout << "\n\n\n";
    }
}

As you might notice I have 4 separate debugging checkpoints that say "Made it to point __". The problem is it doesn't even make it to point "A". I'm not sure if this is an error that the compiler skipped over because it thought the code was kosher or if its something with my computer or something else I can't think of. Pointers have got to be the most confusing thing that almost makes sense that I've ever learned haha.

Any and all help or thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks! Zak

share|improve this question
    
Start with hardcoding the 3 values and get rid of the >> and see if your code works. Then come back, and personally I would guess that you are hitting a return instead of a value, or it is seeing an extra return and the int is not valid. You could just turn the int values from cin to a string and then check if it is a valid value before converting it to an int so you can fail more gracefully. –  James Black Jan 25 at 2:51

3 Answers 3

This code:

for (int i = 0; i < height; i ++) {
    p_cube[i] = new int*[height]; // Creates pointer to 1D array (Columns of Cube)
    for (int j = 0; i < width; i++) {
        p_cube[i][j] = new int[width]; // Creats pointers that are arrays (Rows of Cube)
    }
}

Should be:

for (int i = 0; i < depth; i ++) {
    p_cube[i] = new int*[height]; // Creates pointer to 1D array (Columns of Cube)
    for (int j = 0; j < height; j++) {
        p_cube[i][j] = new int[width]; // Creats pointers that are arrays (Rows of Cube)
    }
}
  • first for loop must go from 0 to depth
  • second for loop must go from 0 to height
  • you were comparing and increasing i instead of j in the second for loop
share|improve this answer
    
This did the trick! You're a saint ichramm! Thanks everyone for helping so quickly! This explanation made the most sense to me and helped clarify how to structure loops that create pointer to pointer array structures. Also Dietmar, I'll have to start double checking to make sure I start putting in checks to my code to provide greater stability and security for my code. Thanks again for all the help! –  ZSButcher Jan 25 at 15:46

The immediately obvious problem is that you are using height as the range of the first loop while there are depth objects.

int ***p_cube = new int**[depth];
// ...
for (int i = 0; i < height; i ++) {
    p_cube[i] = new int*[height];
    // ...
}

If depth != height you'll either have out of bound accesses or you'll access uninitialized memory.

The other issue is you don't check your points which is an extremely bad idea! If the input fails you'll get a random value. Always check after reading that it was successful:

if (std::cin >> depth) { ... }

If the author of the book promotes naked allocations and unchecked reads he does you a great disservice!

share|improve this answer

and good luck learning!

first, i think learning about int*** like this is not a good way to start, as it is very confusing AND inefficient. i recommend simply allocating one block of memory with width*height*depth elements. to traverse through the elements, you can simply iterate index from [0 .. width*height*depth]. to access a particular element, you can calculate it like so: index = i*(width*height) + j*(width) + k.

but to answer your question, i noticed you made a mistake here:

int ***p_cube = new int**[depth];
for (int i = 0; i < height; i ++) {
    p_cube[i] = new int*[height];
    ...

you've made a new array of int** of size 'depth', but then you iterate over it as if it had 'height' elements in it. the correct thing to do is iterate over 'depth' elements, and allocate an int* array.

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