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I'm accessing a SOAP 1.1 web service, and it's returning a fault. The web service does not define any fault contract in the WSDL as far as I can see. My WCF client maps the fault to a FaultException (rather than a FaultException<T>). This all makes sense. The problem is that the service is returning some useful diagnostic information in the detail element of the fault, which I'd like to access so that I can dump it to a trace log. It seems that FaultException does not provide any access to the detail element, presumably because without a fault contract it doesn't know what is in there.

But I don't need to deserialize the detail XML - just the raw XML as a string will do fine for diagnostic purposes.

Is there any way to get access to the detail XML from a WCF client, in this scenario?

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1 Answer

up vote 9 down vote accepted

As detailed here: http://www.theruntime.com/blogs/jacob/archive/2008/01/28/getting-at-the-details.aspx

you can use this workaround to obtain the details:

} catch (FaultException soapEx)
{    
    MessageFault mf = soapEx.CreateMessageFault();    
    if (mf.HasDetail)
    {    
        XmlDictionaryReader reader = mf.GetReaderAtDetailContents();    
        ...    
    }    
}
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Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Andy Jan 25 '10 at 19:55
1  
I'd give you +10 if it was possible.. I just remebered it was somewhere, but I was unable to find that even on MSDN API dump. Many thanks! –  quetzalcoatl May 30 '12 at 9:53
    
Awesome, thanks! You can then iterate through data by doing: while (reader.Read()) { } and access the data inside the loop through reader.Name and reader.Value –  Kyryll Tenin Baum Feb 21 '13 at 7:45
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